Sex, Career and Family: Including An International Review of Women's Roles

By Michael P. Fogarty; Rhona Rapoport et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter XI
Women's Performance on the Job

THE WORK STYLE AND PERFORMANCE OF WOMEN ALREADY SUCCESSFUL IN THEIR CAREERS

There is no evidence from the five occupational studies, nor from studies outside the P.E.P. series, that women who are at present in top jobs or effectively on their way to them adopt a basically different style of working from men or achieve a very different level or type of performance.

For the Civil Service generally (not only the Administrative Grade) Walker found at the end of the 1950s a 'scarcity of important differences between the attitudes of men and women', and 'no evidence that women were in fact less willing to delegate', or that in other respects women in management positions adopt a markedly different management style from men.1

The P.E.P. study of the Administrative Grade confirms this. The Civil Service has no 'women's sphere'. There is some tendency for men and women administrators to go to different departments; men and women are equally likely to be in economic or 'other' ministries, but a relatively high proportion of men are in technical ministries and women in ministries dealing with social services. But this is a question of balance, not (with very few exceptions) of the exclusion of members of either sex from areas open to the other. A woman like a man may find herself administering technology or the docks or the planning of a region; all these are actual recent cases. When the performance of members of the grade who have entered as Assistant Principals since the early 1950s is ranked on a three-factor scale (rank reached, efficiency in present job, and future promise), men's and women's ratings run practically level, with men only a very short head in front. Men who entered just after the Second World War receive ratings higher than either women who entered at that time or men who entered later, but this phenomenon seems to have been once for all. Women tend to provide the 'bread and butter' of the

____________________
1
Walker N., Morale in the Civil Service, Edinburgh, 1961, pp. 251 and 228.

-391-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sex, Career and Family: Including An International Review of Women's Roles
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 581

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.