Analyzing Problems in Schools and School Systems: A Theoretical Approach

By Alan Kibbe Gaynor | Go to book overview

4
Developing a Solution Strategy and Recommendations to Stakeholders

Leadership over human beings is exercised when persons with certain motives and purposes mobilize, in competition or conflict with others, institutional, political, psychological, and other resources so as to arouse, engage, and satisfy the motives of followers.

-- James MacGregor Burns ( 1978, p. 18)


OVERVIEW
The emphasis in chapter 3 is on selecting theories from the literature on organizations to use as analytic frameworks in analyzing the causes of organizational problems and on the importance of being faithful in your analyses to the particular elements and relationships characterizing separate frameworks. Some general guidelines are provided.This chapter focuses on drawing conclusions about the causes of the problem, formulating and evaluating potential solution strategies, and making action recommendations to specific stakeholders (see Steps 7 through 13 in Fig. 1.1).
DRAWING CONCLUSIONS FROM A SINGLE THEORETICAL ANALYSIS
As previously discussed, the central principle governing theoretical analysis is to let the theories drive the analyses. The analytic method explained in this chapter has straightforward procedures:
1. Scan the literature for theories that fit the problem situation.
2. Analyze the causes of the problem in terms of the particular elements and relationships described in each of these analytic frameworks.

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