Tangled Up in School: Politics, Space, Bodies, and Signs in the Educational Process

By Jan Nespor | Go to book overview

Subject Index

A
Abstract space, 70, 76, 83, 91, 105, 107-108, 110, 121-122, 163, 165, 168, 191-192
of corporate practice, 70
as a distancing from the body, 121-122
of finance, 76, 165
housing patterns, 91, 105, 107-108, 110
and popular culture, 191-192
African American community, 85-92
desegregation of schools, 89-90
effects of magnet schools, 90-91
effects of urban renewal on, 86-89

B
Body meanings, see alsoRace
farting, 129-130
"freedom," 119-120
gendering of, 131, 137
grotesque canon, 130-131
regulating the body, 127
individualization, 128
rationalization, 127-8
socialization, 127
spaces of the body vs. bodies in space, 121-122
Business-School partnership, 51-66, 69-80
classrooms as competitive economies, 60-66, 69-80
kids' attempts to make sense of, 69-80
Teacher resistance to, 62-66
corporate educational rhetorics, 51-54
economic rationales for progressive
pedagogy, 43-45
simulating shopping malls, 54-60

C
Cicily, 81, 90-91, 95-105, 107, 116-117, 120-121, 132, 139-140, 152-153, 189-192, 222
girls hit boys fight, 139-140
neighborhood activities, 90-91, 95-105
opinion on desk arrangements, 132
roller skating, 120-121
use of racial categories, 152-153
x-chicks interview, 189-192
Circuits and organizational fields, 30-31
parents', 31-36
comparative, longitudinal view of schools, 31-35, 198
teachers', 39-43
parent-teacher communication, 42-43
teacher disagreement over curriculum, 41-42
teachers as repositories of pedagogical expertise, 39-40
virtual pedagogy, 42, 197
Commodities and exchange, 174-180
comic books, 175-176
shopping, 165-166
sport as spectacle, 179
sports cards, 174-179

D
Desiree, 113-116, 132, 181, 189, 194, 222
neighborhood activities, 113-116
opinion on desk arrangments, 132
theme park dreams, 194
Doug, 98, 100-105, 107, 116, 134, 153, 161, 166-167, 177, 185-187, 189-192, 222, 236
baseball cards, 177
neighborhood activities, 100-104
on reputations of secondary schools, 161

-253-

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