The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte

By Karl Marx; Daniel De Leon | Go to book overview

gether with his regiment, the Colonel refused obedience, took refuge behind the "discipline," and referred Marrast to Changarnier, who scornfully sent him off with the remark that he did not like "bayonettes intelligentes."3 In November, 1851, as the coalized royalists wanted to begin the decisive struggle with Bonaparte, they sought, by means of their notorious "Questors Bill," to enforce the principle of the right of the President of the National Assembly to issue direct requisitions for troops. One of their Generals, Leflo, supported the motion. In vain did Changarnier vote for it, or did Thiers render homage to the cautious wisdom of the late constitutional assembly. The Minister of War, St. Arnaud, answered him as Changarnier had answered Marrast -- and he did so amidst the plaudits of the Mountain.

Thus did the party of Order itself, when as yet it was not the National Assembly, when as yet it was only a Ministry, brand the parliamentary regime. And yet this party objects vociferously when the 2d of December, 1851, banishes that regime from France!

We wish it a happy journey.


III.

On May 29, 1849, the legislative National Assembly convened. On December 2, 1851, it was broken up. This period embraces the term of life of the Constitutional or Parliamentary Republic.

____________________
Intelligent bayonets.

-41-

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The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Publisher's Note to Third Edition 3
  • Translator's Preface 5
  • I 9
  • II 23
  • III 41
  • IV 64
  • V 80
  • VI 108
  • VII 137
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