The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte

By Karl Marx; Daniel De Leon | Go to book overview
parliament loses the supreme command over the Army.
c. January 12 to April 11, 1851. The parliament succumbs in the attempts to regain possession of the administrative power. The party of Order loses its independent parliamentary majority. Its coalition with the republicans and the Mountain.
d. April 11 to October 9, 1851. Attempts at revision, fusion and prorogation. The party of Order dissolves into its component parts. The breach between the bourgeois parliament and the bourgeois press, on the one hand, and the bourgeois mass, on the other, becomes permanent.
e. October 9 to December 2, 1851. Open breach between the parliament and the executive power. It draws up its own decree of death, and goes under, left in the lurch by its own class, by the Army, and by all the other classes. Downfall of the parliamentary régime and of the reign of the bourgeoisie. Bonaparte's triumph. Parody of the imperialist restoration.

VII.

The Social Republic appeared as a mere phrase, as a prophecy on the threshold of the February Revolution; it was smothered in the blood of the Parisian proletariat during the days of 1848, but it stalks about as a spectre throughout the following acts of the drama. The Democratic Republic next makes its bow; it goes out in a fizzle on June 13, 1849, with its runaway small traders; but, on fleeing, it scatters behind it all the more bragging announcements of what it means do to. The Parliamentary Republic, together with the bourgeoisie, then appropriates the whole stage; it lives its life to the full ex

-137-

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The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Publisher's Note to Third Edition 3
  • Translator's Preface 5
  • I 9
  • II 23
  • III 41
  • IV 64
  • V 80
  • VI 108
  • VII 137
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