The Impossible Peace: Britain, the Division of Germany and the Origins of the Cold War

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APPENDIX A *
Extracts from Protocol of the Proceedings of the Berlin Conference, 2 August 1945
Top secret BERLIN, 2 August 1945The Berlin Conference of the Three Heads of Government of the U.S.S.R., United States and United Kingdom which took place from the 17th July to the 2nd August, 1945, came to the following conclusions:
I. -- Establishment of a Council of Foreign Ministers
A. The Conference reached the following agreement for the establishment of a Council of Foreign Ministers to do the necessary preparatory work for the peace settlements:-
'(1) There shall be established a Council composed of the Foreign Ministers of the United Kingdom, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, China, France and the United States.
(2) (i) The Council shall normally meet in London, which shall be the permanent seat of the joint Secretariat which the Council will form. Each of the Foreign Ministers will be accompanied by a high-ranking Deputy, duly authorised to carry on the work of the Council in the absence of his Foreign Minister, and by a small staff of technical advisers.

(ii) The first meeting of the Council shall be held in London not later than the 1st September, 1945. Meetings may be held by common agreement in other capitals as may be agreed from time to time.

(3) (i) As its immediate important task, the Council shall be authorised to draw up, with a view to their submission to the United Nations, treaties of peace with Italy, Roumania, Bulgaria, Hungary and Finland, and to propose settlements of territorial questions outstanding on the termination of the war in Europe. The Council shall be utilised for the preparation of a peace settlement for Germany to be accepted by the Government of Germany when a Government adequate for the purpose is established.
____________________
*
FO 93/1/ 238, 2 August 1945, Butler, Rohan, and Pelly, M. E. (eds.), Documents on British Policy Overseas Series I, Volume i, 1945. (HMSO, 1984), 1262 ff. Reproduced by permission of the Controller of Her Majesty's Stationery Office.

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