The Impossible Peace: Britain, the Division of Germany and the Origins of the Cold War

By Anne Deighton | Go to book overview

APPENDIX B *
CAB129/17 Extracts from C.P. (47) 68 20 February 1947

CABINET
MAIN SHORT-TERM PROBLEMS CONFRONTING US IN MOSCOW: SUMMARISED CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

Memorandum by the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs
1. I ask my colleagues to agree:-
(i) That we should resist any claims which may be put forward for current reparation deliveries either from Eastern or Western Germany.
(ii) That as a principal condition of economic unity we should obtain Russian agreement to bearing a reasonable share in the burden already borne and to be borne by the Occupying Powers in respect of relief imports and external costs of occupation of Germany as a whole.
(iii) The demand for reparations from current production should not be refused outright. It should, however, be made clear that it cannot be considered until Germany has established a favourable foreign exchange balance and has met the expenses incurred by the Occupying Powers.
(iv) That we should insist on an upward revision of the level of Industry Plan with a minimum steel production level of 10 million tons, the steel using industries being adjusted to a level appropriate to this steel output.
(v) That we should insist on associating the discussion of economic problems with the consideration of the future political structure of Germany.
(vi) That for the purpose of dealing with points raised in (i)-(iv) above we shall table, at the earliest opportunity in Moscow,
____________________
*
Reproduced with the permission of the Controller of Her Majesty's Stationery Office.

-244-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Impossible Peace: Britain, the Division of Germany and the Origins of the Cold War
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 283

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.