CHAPTER XXIX
MONSIEUR'S FÊTE

I WAS up the next morning an hour before daybreak, and finished my guard, kneeling on the dormitory floor beside the centre stand, for the benefit of such expiring glimmer as the night-lamp afforded in its last watch.

All my materials--my whole stock of beads and silk-- were used up before the chain assumed the length and richness I wished; I had wrought it double, as I knew, by the rule of contraries, that to suit the particular taste whose gratification was in view an effective appearance was quite indispensable. As a finish to the ornament, a little gold clasp was needed; fortunately I possessed it in the fastening of my sole necklace; I duly detached and re-attached it, then coiled compactly the completed guard, and enclosed it in a small box I had bought for its brilliancy, made of some tropic shell of the colour called 'nacarat,' and decked with a little coronal of sparkling blue stones. Within the lid of the box I carefully graved with my scissors' point certain initials.

The reader will, perhaps, remember the description of Madame Beck's fête; nor will he have forgotten that at each anniversary a handsome present was subscribed for and offered by the school. The observance of this day was a distinction accorded to none but Madame, and, in a modified form, to her kinsman and counsellor, M. Emanuel. In the latter case it was an honour spontaneously awarded, not

-399-

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Villette
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Title Page xxxv
  • Chapter I - BRETTON 1
  • Chapter II - PAULINA 9
  • Chapter III - THE PLAYMATES 17
  • Chapter IV - MISS MARCHMONT 36
  • Chapter V - TURNING A NEW LEAF 46
  • Chapter VI - LONDON 52
  • Chapter VII - VILLETTE 65
  • Chapter VIII - MADAME BECK 76
  • Chapter IX - ISIDORE 93
  • Chapter X - DR. JOHN 106
  • Chapter XI - THE PORTRESS'S CABINET 114
  • Chapter XII - THE CASKET 122
  • Chapter XIII - A SNEEZE OUT OF SEASON 134
  • Chapter XIV - THE FÊTE 146
  • Chapter XV - THE LONG VACATION 179
  • Chapter XVI - AULD LANG SYNE 193
  • Chapter XVII - LA TERRASSE 210
  • Chapter XVIII - WE QUARREL 221
  • Chapter XIX - THE CLEOPATRA 230
  • Chapter XX - THE CONCERT 244
  • Chapter XXI - REACTION 268
  • Chapter XXII - THE LETTER 288
  • Chapter XXIII - VASHIT 300
  • Chapter XXIV - M. DE BASSOMPIERRE 316
  • Chapter XXV - THE LITTLE COUNTESS 332
  • Chapter XXVI - A BURIAL 348
  • Chapter XXVII - THE HÔTEL CRÉCY 366
  • Chapter XXVIII - THE WATCHGUARD 385
  • Chapter XXIX - MONSIEUR'S FÊTE 399
  • Chapter XXX M. Paul 415
  • Chapter XXXI - THE DRYAD 428
  • Chapter XXXII - THE FIRST LETTER 440
  • Chapter XXXIII - M. PAUL KEEPS HIS PROMISE 451
  • Chapter XXXIV Malevola 461
  • Chapter XXXV - FRATERNITY 475
  • Chapter XXXVI - THE APPLE OF DISCORD 490
  • Chapter XXXVII - SUNSHINE 507
  • Chapter XXXVIII - CLOUD 525
  • Chapter Xxxix - OLD AND NEW ACQUAINTANCE 553
  • Chapter XL - THE HAPPY PAIR 566
  • Chapter XLI Faubourg Clotilde 574
  • Chapter XLII - FINIS 590
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