Opening Up the Soviet Economy

By Jerry F. Hough | Go to book overview

3
The Strategy of Reform

DESPITE Mikhail Gorbachev's bold language about economic reform, relatively little such reform occurred in his first year and a half in office. Many Soviet intellectuals and western observers pointed to the obstacles outlined in the previous chapter as the reason for the difference between words and deeds. Then in the winter of 1986-87, the regime ratified a series of potentially quite radical decisions that legalized private labor, independent cooperatives, and joint ventures based on foreign investment. Most analysts still insisted that political opposition would prevent these measures from being carried out to any significant degree. The June 1987 plenum of the Central Committee, with its decision on economic reform and its three additions to the Politburo, temporarily stilled this talk of major opposition, but talk of defeats and opposition recurred in the fall.

Possibly the dire predictions for Gorbachev will prove to be correct, but, as noted earlier, a policy-relevant analysis must begin at another point. Since Gorbachev told the editors of Time that "foreign policy is a continuation of domestic policy,"1 it is important to understand the steps that he has taken in his first years. Many western analysts assumed that he was learning on the job and improvising. This may be true of minor steps, but the evidence strongly suggests that he has had a general strategy of reform--and a general foreign policy strategy to go with it. A failure to grasp this strategy risks serious foreign mistakes on the part of the West.

____________________
1
Special Report: Moscow's Vigorous Leader, Time, September 9, 1985, p. 29.

-27-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Opening Up the Soviet Economy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Contents ix
  • 1- Introduction 1
  • 2- The Context of Reform 6
  • 3- The Strategy of Reform 27
  • 4- Foreign Economic Policy 54
  • 5- Choices for The United States 78
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 100

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.