Misreading the Public: The Myth of a New Isolationism

By Steven Kull; I. M. Destler | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book is the final product of the Project on Foreign Policy and the Public, inaugurated in 1995 by the Center for International and Security Studies at Maryland (CISSM) and its Program on International Policy Attitudes (PIPA). The project was made possible by a generous grant from the Ford Foundation. And the book was, in the end, the product of many hands besides the two coauthors.

Our greatest single debt is to Clay Ramsay, senior research fellow at PIPA, who as a partner in our public opinion research contributed important ideas throughout the development of the project and was coauthor of our October 1997 report on the project, titled The Foreign Policy Gap: How Policymakers Misread the Public. The core chapters of this book are based on that report.

Monica Wolford, also senior research fellow at PIPA, participated in developing the poll questionnaires and conducted the major statistical analyses. (Persons interested in demographic variations in poll responses should consult appendix A, written by Wolford, to The Foreign Policy Gap.) Frances G. Burwell, executive director of CISSM, made numerous conceptual contributions and managed key aspects of the project--particularly our October 1997 conference. Ivo H. Daalder, director of research at CISSM, provided important perspectives throughout.

-v-

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Misreading the Public: The Myth of a New Isolationism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • ABOUT BROOKINGS iv
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword 1
  • 1- The Puzzle 9
  • PART ONE The Gap 33
  • 2- America's Role In Today's, World 35
  • 3- The United Nations 59
  • 4- Un Peacekeeping 81
  • 5- Foreign Aid 113
  • 6- Defense Spending 134
  • PART TWO Challenging the Gap 151
  • 7- Letting Policy Practitioners Ask The Questions 153
  • 8- How the Public Makes Budgetary Trade-Offs 179
  • 9- Does Congress Mirror the Public? 193
  • PART THREE Explaining the Gap 205
  • 10- Why Do Policy Practitioners Misperceive the Public? 207
  • 11- Why Doesn't Politics Close the Gap? 229
  • 12- Putting the Puzzle Together 249
  • Appendix: Design of the Study 267
  • Notes 277
  • Index 303
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