Free Trade between Mexico and the United States?

By Sidney Weintraub | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CHAPTER ONE
Introduction

THE PURPOSE of this study is to examine whether a slow but steady movement to free trade between Mexico and the United States would benefit both countries. The theme is controversial. Detractors in Mexico will interpret it as the latest U.S. device to exercise political and economic hegemony over Mexico. Detractors in the United States will object that, at best, free trade would lead to a flow of goods into the United States made with cheap Mexican labor and, at worst, would encourage Mexican labor to emigrate. Impartial economists in both countries will question whether it is feasible for two countries vastly unequal in economic strength to have free trade without the economic progress of the weaker country being held back. Each of these issues will be analyzed in the following chapters.

There has been considerable study of the effects of free trade between Canada and the United States but none of any significance about what the economic consequences might be if Mexico and the United States began to move toward free trade.1 Such study never seemed worthwhile. The conventional wisdom has been that the economics of free trade between Mexico and the United States would benefit only the United States because of the greater efficiency and higher productivity of its industry. The instinctive expectation in Mexico has been that if free trade actually did encourage greater specialization in each country, the

____________________
1
Examples of studies on U.S.-Canadian free trade include Ronald J. Wonnacott and Paul Wonnacott, Free Trade between the United States and Canada: The Potential Economic Effects and U.S.-Canadian Free Trade: The Potential Impact on the Canadian Economy; Sperry Lea, A Canada-U.S. Free Trade Arrangement: Survey of Possible Characteristics; Canadian-American Committee, A Possible Plan for a Canada-U.S. Free Trade Area; Canadian Parliament, Senate, Canada-United States Relations, vols. 2 and 3: Canada's Trade Relations with the United States; Sidney Weintraub, "Fear of Free Trade", pp. 9-12. Full references to the works cited appear in the bibliography.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Free Trade between Mexico and the United States?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 205

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?