1905 in St. Petersburg: Labor, Society, and Revolution

By Gerald D. Surh | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book owes its existence to the help of many people, and it is my pleasure to acknowledge the debt. Above all, Reginald E. Zelnik has rendered invaluable aid as friend, critic, and counselor as well as my dissertation supervisor and the most careful reader of the last version of the manuscript. His comments have always been distinguished by their temperate, balanced tone and by the unique insight into my work that his own mastery of Russian labor and urban social history has given him. Reggie's unstinting generosity in all of these capacities is well known by his students and colleagues, and I have been fortunate to count myself among them. Laura Engelstein has also read the manuscript at various stages, and I have greatly benefited from her incisive observations and judicious advice. Leopold H. Haimson and the participants in his seminar on Russian labor history at the Harriman Institute, Columbia University, made it possible for me to compare my work with that of some of the leading contributors to the field, and Leo himself has offered encouragement, advice, and support at every turn.

Several others should be singled out from a much longer list of those who eased and facilitated my work. (As with those just mentioned, none of them bears any responsibility for the book's ideas or conclusions, for which I alone am accountable.) In the Soviet Union scholarly counsel and encouragement were generously offered me by Boris V. Anan'ich, Valerii I. Bovykin, Rafail Sh. Ganelin, and Ura A. Shuster of the Institute of History of the USSR Academy of Sciences. My work in the magnificent research facilities of the USSR was aided immeasurably by the administration and staff of the three archives and three principal libraries I used: the Central State Archive of the

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
1905 in St. Petersburg: Labor, Society, and Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 460

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.