Telling Tales: The Hysteric's Seduction in Fiction and Theory

By Katherine Cummings | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
Seduction and Psychoanalysis

The action of the play Oedipus Rexconsists in nothing other than the process of revealing, with cunning delays and ever-mounting excitement--a process that can be likened to the work of psycho-analysis--that Oedipus himself is the murderer of Laius, but further that he is the son of the murdered man and of Jocasta.

Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams (emphasis added)

I am aware that--in this town at least--there are many physicians who (revolting though it may seem) choose to read a case history of . . . [hysteria] not as a contribution to the psychopathology of neuroses, but as a roman à clef designed for their private delectation.

Freud, Dora: Fragment of an Analysis of a Case of Hysteria

I liked the doctors quite well. . . . The annoying thing was . . . their authority. . . . They would fall upon scraps of my thought: "This is ours." They would challenge my story: "Talk," and my story would put itself at their service.

Maurice Blanchot, The Madness of the Day


Overture(s)

Psychoanalysis tells tales. Yet it does not "create" them. Rather, it repeats, sometimes betraying confidences from therapy, but always borrowing from other accounts, among them physics, philosophy, anthropology, and religion. The most telling debt of psychoanalysis has been to literature, however, and is the debt I most mean to

-19-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Telling Tales: The Hysteric's Seduction in Fiction and Theory
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • A Note to the Reader xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One Seduction and Psychoanalysis 19
  • Epilogue 65
  • Interlude: "Between the Acts" 67
  • Chapter Two Clarissa's "Life with Father" 90
  • Interlude: A Spurious Set (Up) 157
  • Chapter Three Rereading Bleak House: the Chronicle Of A "Little Body" and Its Perverse Defense 191
  • Chapter Four Translation, Transference, and Other "Tender in the Night" 230
  • Epilogue 279
  • Reference Matter 281
  • Works Cited 283
  • Index 293
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 308

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.