Epistolary Bodies: Gender and Genre in the Eighteenth-Century Republic of Letters

By Elizabeth Heckendorn Cook | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1.
Kernan, Samuel Johnson, p. 4. Other historians of the book and of print culture have traced aspects of the same transition, and this study is especially indebted to the work of Benedict Anderson, Roger Chartier, Robert Darnton, Elizabeth Eisenstein, and Jon Klancher.
2.
This reading of Lady Bradshaigh Clarissa as mediating between auratic and mechanically reproducible forms of the book is of course indebted to Benjamin essays "Unpacking My Library: A Talk About Book Collecting" and "The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction," reprinted in Illuminations, pp. 59-68 and 217-52.

Chapter One
1.
Foucault, "What Is an Author?" p. 108.
2.
Ibid., p. 117.
3.
This use of the adjective "private" often masks the long ideological collaboration between an ostensibly individualistic "exploring spirit" and more or less officially sponsored economic imperialism, the profound entanglement of so-called private and public motives that underwrote, for example, the history of the East India Company. For a synopsis of the various ways in which economic activity has been classified in relation to the public-private dichotomy, see Jeff Weintraub's "The Theory and Politics of the Public/Private Distinc

-183-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Epistolary Bodies: Gender and Genre in the Eighteenth-Century Republic of Letters
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 244

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.