CHAPTER LXIII.

When the subject of the trial was happily dismissed, my first inquiry related to Eunice. The reply was made with an ominous accompaniment of sighs and sad looks. Eunice had gone back to her duties as governess at the farm. Hearing this, I asked naturally what had become of Philip.

Melancholy news, again, was the news that I now heard, Mr. Dunboyne the elder had died suddenly, at his house in Ireland, while Philip was on his way home. When the funeral ceremony had come to an end, the will was read. It had been made only a few days before the testator's death; and the clause which left all his property to his son was preceded by expressions of paternal affection, at a time when Philip was in sore need of consolation. After alluding to a letter, received from his son, the old man added: "I always loved him, without caring to confess it; I detest scenes of sentiment, kissings, embracings, tears, and that sort of thing. But Philip has yielded to my wishes, and has broken off a marriage which would have made him, as well as me, wretched for life. After this, I may speak my mind from my grave, and may tell my boy that I loved him. If the wish is likely to be of any use, I will add (on the chance)--God bless him."

"Does Philip submit to separation from Eunice?" I asked. "Does he stay in Ireland?"

"Not he, poor fellow! He will be here, to-morrow or next day. When I last wrote," Miss Jillgall continued, "I told him I hoped to see you again soon. If you can't help us (I mean with Eunice), that unlucky young man will do some desperate thing. He will join those madmen at large, who disturb poor savages in Africa, or go nowhere to find nothing in the arctic regions."

"Whatever I can do, Miss Jillgall, shall be gladly done. Is it really possible that Eunice refuses to marry him, after having saved his life?"

"A little patience, please, Mr. Governor; let Phihp tell his own story. If I try to do it, I shall only cry--and we have had tears enough lately, in this house."

Further consultation being thus deferred, I went upstairs to the Minister's room.

-289-

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