War and Peace

By Leo Tolstoy; Louise Maude et al. | Go to book overview

NOTES
[M] indicates that the note is the translator's.

BOOK ONE

PART ONE
3 Genoa and Lucca are now just family estates of the Buonapartes: Napoleon seized them in June 1805. He had made himself Emperor of the French in December 1804, but Anna Scherer and her associates refer to him slightingly as ' Buonaparte' (the Corsican upstart).
4 Novosiltsev's dispatch: a new coalition which included England, Russia, Austria, and Prussia was being formed against France. Napoleon unexpectedly proposed peace to England. At the latter's request Tsar Alexander had sent N. N. Novosiltsev as intermediary, but on hearing at Berlin about the seizure of Genoa he turned back.
11the murder of the Duc d'Enghien: the young duke, a member of the Bourbon family, was alleged to have taken part in a conspiracy of 1804 to assassinate Napoleon, then First Consul. He was kidnapped on neutral territory, tried by an irregular court martial, and shot
13Mademoiselle George: this celebrated French tragic actress (who failed to impress Pushkin) appeared in Petersburg and Moscow during the years 1808-12. Natasha hem her declaim in Hélène's drawing room ( 11 v 13).
17In 1805 M. I. Kutuzov ( 1745-1813) already enjoyed a great military reputation. He had taken part in the Turkish wars in Catherine's reign and together with Suvorov had captured the fortresses of Ochakov and Igmail but had been seriously wounded and lost an eye. Having displeased Alexander in the post of Governor- General of Petersburg, he had been living for three years in disfavour in the country, but was now recalled to lead an army of 50,000 men to the aid of Austria [M].

Dieu me la donne, gare à qui la touche!: 'God has given it to me, let him beware who shad touch it'.

18 Maude dismisses Hippolyte's heraldry as 'untranslatable non- sense'.

-1317-

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