Modern Verse in English, 1900-1950

By David Cecil; Allen Tate | Go to book overview

John Wheelwright (Am. 1897-1940)

Apocryphal Apocalypse

Wisemen to glossators unknown
when the Assisian or the Galilean
entered to the death which made his life
lustless in hope to find with keener sperm
have said:
"We liked him, but we found him hard to chat with.
His conversation bored us more than talk."
You gluttons for seedless speech and vegex meat
who fondle terms to dull their definitions
and chew in vain each mouthful more and more
of day by day to find water taste sweet;
though sunk in boredom beyond excavations,
dose yourselves with bottled conversation's
pedantic antidote to boredom's poison.
Make of the Dictionary your Book of Truth
to hear the Apocalypse of Wheels with puckered lips:

Beware, beware like dogs with indoor faces
all fops and frumps who think it good, or better
for every man to follow his ideal:
anti William Carlos Williams Oscar Williamses
(less Apollonian than plumbers, laureate)
Waldos, un-Emersonian frank
(imbecile in paradisian beatitude)
who ruminate on something . . . something
which men who lack a more definite term call Holy, Holy
(wholly holy, hale, and wholly wholesome).
Combatting thought with thought's own element
Pied Piper fops flute the Youth towards Baby's Cave.
But above all Bores, the Hegelian Yes-Man Frump
beware who reconciles thought's hostile poles with
smiles
(synthetic smiles) to prove his platitude
quite true: "Evil is the shadow side of Good."
God-the-Etemal-Bore-of-Bores subsists
in see-saw half-affirmation
(As A.E. and E.A.

-416-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Modern Verse in English, 1900-1950
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 690

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.