Modern Verse in English, 1900-1950

By David Cecil; Allen Tate | Go to book overview

INDEX OF FIRST LINES
A Bird came down the Walk page 51
A brackish reach of shoal off Madaket 609
A candle lit in darkness of black waters 350
A day like any day. Though any day now 356
A frosty Christmas Eve 95
A ghost is someone; death has left a hole 613
A man there is of fire and straw 426
a man who had fallen among thieves 387
A perverse habit of cat-goddesses 394
A sallow waiter brings me six huge oysters 268
A scent of esparto grass--and again I recall 215
A snake came to my water-trough 243
A sudden blow: the great wings beating still 116
A toad the power mower caught 624
After great pain a formal feeling comes 54
After hot loveless nights, when cold winds stream 465
After the blast of lightning from the East 367
After the first powerful, plain manifesto 539
After the funeral, mule praises, brays 596
Ah, all the sands of the earth lead unto heaven 618
Ah, look, 488
Ah, there is no abiding 111
Alive where I lie and hide 616
All day, knowing you dead 356
All endeavor to be beautiful 602
All Greece hates 274
All night there had sought in vain 453
All out of doors looked darkly in at him 190
Alone on Lykaion since man hath been 187
Along the graceless grass of town 106
Although it is a cold evening 550
And death shall have no dominion 601
And he cast it down, down, on the green grass 345
And here face down beneath the sun 361
And I have come upon this place 359
And now she cleans her teeth into the lake 512
And then I pressed the shell 227
And then went down to the ship 256
And yet this great wink of eternity 430
Apeneck Sweeney spreads his knees 320
April is the cruellest month 321
Argentina in one swing of the bell skirt 513
Around, above my bed, the pitch-dark fly 623

-669-

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