The Duchess of Berry and the Court of Charles X

By Imbert De Saint-Amand | Go to book overview

VIII
THE ORLEANS FAMILY
AT the accession of Charles X., Louis Philippe, Duke of Orleans, chief of the younger branch of the Bourbons, born at Paris, October 6th, 1773, was not yet fifty-seven years old. He married November 25th, 1809, Marie-Amélie, Princess of the Two Sicilies, whose father, Ferdinand I., reigned at Naples, and whose mother, the Queen Marie-Caroline, sister of Marie Antoinette, died at Venice, September 7th, 1814. Marie-Amélie, born April 26th, 1782, was forty-two years old when Charles X. ascended the throne. Of her marriage with the Duke of Orleans there were born five sons and four daughters: --
1. Ferdinand-Philippe-Louis-Charles-Henri-Roulin, Duke of Chartres, born at Palermo, September 3d, 1810. (When his father became King, he took the title of Duke of Orleans, and died from a fall from his carriage going from the Tuileries to Neuilly on the Chemin de la Révolte, July 13th, 1842.)
2. Louise-Marie-Thérèse-Caroline-Elisabeth, Mademoiselle d'Orléans, born at Palermo the 3d of April, 1812. (She married the King of the Bel

-72-

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The Duchess of Berry and the Court of Charles X
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • I - The Accession of Charles X 1
  • II - The Entry into Paris 11
  • III - The Tombs of Saint-Denis 20
  • IV - The Funeral of Louis XVIII 29
  • V - The King 41
  • VI - The Dauphin and Dauphiness 48
  • VII - Madame 58
  • VIII - The Orleans Family 72
  • IX - The Prince of CondÉ 81
  • X - The Court 90
  • XI - The Duke of Doudeauville 104
  • XII - The Household of the Duchess of Berry 114
  • XIII - The Preparations for the Coronation 123
  • XIV - The Coronation 139
  • XV - Close of the Sojourn at Rheims 152
  • XVI - The Re-Entrance into Paris 160
  • XVII - The Jubilee Of 166
  • XVIII - The Duchess of Gontaut 177
  • XIX - The Three Governors 187
  • XX- The Review of the National Guard 198
  • XXI - The First Disquietude 208
  • XXIII - The Journey in the West 224
  • XXIV- The Mary Stuart Ball 237
  • XXV - The Fine Arts 245
  • XXVI - The Theatre of Madame 257
  • XXVII - Dieppe 266
  • XXVIII - The Prince De Polignac 276
  • XXIX - General De Bourmont 286
  • XXX - The Journey in the South 292
  • Index 299
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