The First Transcontinental Railroad: Central Pacific, Union Pacific

By John Debo Galloway | Go to book overview

ILLUSTRATIONS
CENTRAL PACIFIC SECTION
Officers of the Central Pacific Railroad Company, Southern Pacific
Theodore Dehone Judah Memorial, J. F. Coleman, Pres., Amer. Soc. of Civil Engineers
Theodore Dehone Judah, Carl I. Wheat
Map drawn by Theodore D. Judah, National Archives and Southern Pacific
Central Pacific construction chiefs, Southern Pacific, (Clement) R. M. Clement
Fill at Heath's Ravine in the Sierra Nevada, Southern Pacific
Owl Gap Cut near Blue Canyon, California, Southern Pacific
Track-laying operations in Nevada deserts, Southern Pacific
Central Pacific coustruction town of Carlin, Nevada, Southern Pacific
Two types of Central Pacific wooden bridges, Southern Pacific
First railroad bridge over the American River, Southern Pacific
Early Central Pacific bridges, Southern Pacific, (Howe truss) D. L. Joslyn
Snow protection in the high Sierra, Southern Pacific
Two Central Pacific tunnels and a cut, (Donner Lake) D. L. Joslyn, Southern Pacific
Scene at Truckee Depot, Southern Pacific
Stage coaches met trains at Colfax, California, Southern Pacific
Fire-fighting train "Grey Eagle," W. A. Lucas
Two commissioners on pilot beam of the "Falcon," W. A. Lucas
The locomotive "Hercules" at Cisco, W. A. Lucas
Water train pulled by locomotive "El Dorado," W. A. Lucas
"C. P. Huntington" as it looks today, W. A. Lucas
"C. P. Huntington" during the building of the railroad, W. A. Lucas
Engine No. 60, the "Jupiter," lets off steam, W. A. Lucas
President Stanford's train on the way to the meeting of the rails, W. A. Lucas
Historic scene at Promontory on May 10, 1869, W. A. Lucas
Sign marking end of ten-mile section of track laid in one day, Southern Pacific
UNION PACIFIC SECTION
Officers of the Union Pacific Railroad, Union Pacific
Leaders in Union Pacific engineering and construction, Union Pacific, (Dey) Iowa Hist. Soc., (Casement) D. M. Casement

-vi-

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