Biographical Sketches of Eminent American Statesmen, with Speeches, Addresses and Letters

By B. F. Perry | Go to book overview

CHARLES PICKNEY.

No statesman in South Carolina ever filled as many high and important positions in the State and Federal Government as Charles Pinckney, the subject of this brief memoir. He was four times elected Governor of South Carolina. He served in both the Colonial and State Legislatures for many years. He was appointed by the Legislatures to represent the State in the old Continental Congress. He was a distinguished member of the Federal Convention which framed the Constitution of the United States. He was an active member of the State Convention which adopted that Constitution. The people of Charleston elected him a member of the House of Representatives in Congress. He presided over the State Convention which framed the Constitution of 1790. He was elected by the Legislature United States Senator. President Jefferson appointed him Minister to Spain, and he negotiated a treaty by which the Spanish Government released all claim which she had to the magnificent territory ceded by France to the United States. Where is the name of another statesman in South Carolina whose record is so full of honors and distinctions?

In my sketch of General Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, already published, I gave some account of the Pinckney family in South Carolina and Maryland. William Pinkney, the great and accomplished statesman, lawyer and orator of Annapolis, was a branch of the South Carolina family. Thomas Pinckney, the progenitor of the family in South Carolina, emigrated from Lincolnshire, England, to Charleston, in 1687, a few years after the first settlement of South Carolina. He was a gentleman of large wealth, and built a mag

-447-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Biographical Sketches of Eminent American Statesmen, with Speeches, Addresses and Letters
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 619

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.