The Lying Valet: A Peep behind the Curtain; Or, the New Rehearsal. Bon Ton; Or, High Life above Stairs

By David Garrick; Louise Brown Osborn | Go to book overview

ACT II.
The Stage.

Enter Glib, Sir Toby, Lady and Miss Fuz, Patent, &c.

Glib. What, we have lost Sir Macaroni! no great matter, for he was half asleep all the time he was here --very little better than a caput mortuum--Now, Ladies, and Gentlemen, of the jury, take your places. --Hiss and clap, condemn or applaud me as your taste directs you, and Apollo and the Nine send me a good deliverance.

Lady Fuz. We'll go into the front boxes.--What is the matter with you, Fanny?--You had rather be at your inconstant moon than hear Mr. Glib's wit.

Miss Fuz. I never was happier in all my life, Mama. [Sighs. What will become of me? [Aside.

Sir Tob. I shall be very critical, Mr. Author.

Lady Fuz. Pray are we to have a prologue, Mr. Glib? We positively must have a prologue.

Glib. Most certainly--entre nous--I have desired the Manager to write me one--which has so flattered him, that I shall be able to do anything with him-- [Aside to Lady Fuz.] I know 'em all from the Patentees, down to the waiting fellows in green coats--

Sir Tob. You are very happy in your acquaintance, Sir.

-74-

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The Lying Valet: A Peep behind the Curtain; Or, the New Rehearsal. Bon Ton; Or, High Life above Stairs
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • ILLUSTRATIONS vii
  • Introduction ix
  • The Lying Valet. 1
  • SCENE II. MELISSA'S Lodgings. 13
  • ACT II. 22
  • EPILOGUE, 44
  • A Peep Behind the Curtain; Or, The New Rehearsal. 47
  • PROLOGUE. 51
  • A PEEP BEHIND THE CURTAIN; OR, The New Rehearsal. 53
  • SCENE II. The Playhouse. 56
  • ACT II. The Stage. 74
  • Bon Ton; Or, High Life Above Stairs. 91
  • PROLOGUE, Written by GEORGE COLMAN. Spoken by Mr. KING. 95
  • ACT I. 99
  • SCENE III Lady Minikin's Apartments. 118
  • ACT II. 122
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