The Lying Valet: A Peep behind the Curtain; Or, the New Rehearsal. Bon Ton; Or, High Life above Stairs

By David Garrick; Louise Brown Osborn | Go to book overview

PROLOGUE,
Written by GEORGE COLMAN.
Spoken by Mr. KING.

FASHION in ev'ry thing bears sov'reign sway,
And words and periwigs have both their day:
Each have their purlieus too, are modish each
In stated districts, wigs as well as speech.
The Tyburn scratch, thick club, and Temple tie.
The parson's feather-top, frizz'd broad and high!
The coachman's cauliflower, built tiers and tiers!
Differ not more from bags and brigadiers,
Than great St. George's, or St. James's styles,
From the broad dialect of Broad St. Giles.

What is Bon Ton?--Oh, damme, cries a buck--
Half drunk--ask me, my dear, and you're in luck!
Bon Ton's to swear, break windows, beat the watch,
Pick up a wench, drink healths, and roar a catch.
Keep it up, keep it up! damme, take your swing!
Bon Ton is Life, my boy; Bon Ton's the thing!

Ah! I loves life, and all the joys it yields--
Says Madam Fussock, warm from Spital-fields.
Bone Tone's the space 'twixt Saturday and Monday,
And riding in a one-horse chair o' Sunday!
'Tis drinking tea on summer afternoons
At Bagnigge-Wells, with China and gilt spoons!
'Tis laying by our stuffs, red cloaks, and pattens,
To dance Cow-tillions, all in silks and satins!

-95-

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The Lying Valet: A Peep behind the Curtain; Or, the New Rehearsal. Bon Ton; Or, High Life above Stairs
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • ILLUSTRATIONS vii
  • Introduction ix
  • The Lying Valet. 1
  • SCENE II. MELISSA'S Lodgings. 13
  • ACT II. 22
  • EPILOGUE, 44
  • A Peep Behind the Curtain; Or, The New Rehearsal. 47
  • PROLOGUE. 51
  • A PEEP BEHIND THE CURTAIN; OR, The New Rehearsal. 53
  • SCENE II. The Playhouse. 56
  • ACT II. The Stage. 74
  • Bon Ton; Or, High Life Above Stairs. 91
  • PROLOGUE, Written by GEORGE COLMAN. Spoken by Mr. KING. 95
  • ACT I. 99
  • SCENE III Lady Minikin's Apartments. 118
  • ACT II. 122
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