The East India Company: A History

By Philip Lawson | Go to book overview

Preface

The East India Company's history is central to the British experience of trade and territorial expansion overseas. Its longevity, spanning over two and a half centuries from its founding in 1600, and critical role in bringing India and other eastern lands into the British empire, mark the Company out as unique in the nation's history. No less important, those involved in this enterprise have provided a romantic anthology of tales and legends for succeeding generations to pore over. The poetry of Kipling, the prose of Henty and the celluloid stars of the twentieth century in the Bengal Lancers fighting exotic rulers of kingdoms in the Orient, have carried historical fact into fantasy and folklore. National heroes have been carved out of the military exploits of men such as Clive, Hastings and Wellesley, and, in the process, a cult of the Raj developed which has been impossible to eradicate from the mass of literature published on the Anglo-Indian past.

Why this pattern or manner of writing about the East India Company developed is not so surprising from an academic viewpoint. The Company's involvement in the East was an epic story on a grand scale. Moreover, the one thing the Company's history possesses in abundance is archival and secondary material documenting its development. The sheer volume of manuscripts, scholarly books, articles, popular histories and pot-boilers conveying some aspect of the Company's past defies description. It would take several lifetimes to read all that exists today on the East India Company's history and nothing suggests the production will cease in the near future. Scholars on four continents are presently devoted to revealing every detail of the Company's advance, from its humble seventeenth-century origins to full-blown agent of imperialism by 1857.

-viii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The East India Company: A History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Studies in Modern History ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Maps vii
  • Preface viii
  • Chapter Four - The Company''s Expanding Universe- 1709-48 64
  • Notes 85
  • Postscript 164
  • Bibliography 167
  • Maps 179
  • Index 183
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 188

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.