Interpretation, Deconstruction, and Ideology: An Introduction to Some Current Issues in Literary Theory

By Christopher Butler | Go to book overview

Notes

Translations are by the author, except where/otherwise indicated


I Implication
1.
I refer here to the work of H. P. Grice, particularly his 'Logic and Conversation' in P. Cole and J. Morgan (eds.), Syntax and Semantics 3: Speech Acts ( New York 1975). Grice argues that speaker/hearer relationships can be seen to be governed by maxims, for example that of the 'co-operative principle' which demands informativeness for the purpose of the exchange, truth-telling, relevance, and perspicuity. I believe these conditions to apply also to text/reader relationships, though they are only normally assumed to be in force. M. L. Pratt, who elaborates a Gricean theory of the text in her Towards a Speech Act Theory of Literary Discourse ( London 1977), points out that the literary text is often most interesting when it violates or 'flouts' these principles, as obviously in Tristram Shandy (see her 135 ff., 152 ff. and 163 ff.).
2.
N. Smith and D. Wilson, Modern Linguistics; the results of Chomsky's Revolution ( Harmondsworth 1979), 148 ff. Cf. also T. Van Dijk, Text and Context ( London 1977), 111 f.; and on the interplay between 'experiential' and logical systems cf. also M. A. K. Halliday, Language as Social Semiotic ( London 1978), 130 ff.
3.
Smith and Wilson, op.cit. 173.
5.
Henry James, The Golden Bowl, Book II, Ch.42.
6.
On conversational implication and our knowledge of the personal history of the participants, cf. R. de Beaugrande, Text Discourse and Process ( London 1980), 246 f.
7.
Halliday, op.cit. 136. For the further contrast of conversation and text see his 140 f. Pratt on the other hand (op.cit., Ch. IV and passim), argues that conversational principles apply equally well to literary texts. See also Beaugrande (op.cit. VIII, 2, 242-54), on conversation. Browning's dramatic monologues offer some typical problems for the reader's construction of a cotext.
8.
It comes from D. Rumelhart "Some Problems with the Notion of Literal Meaning" in A. Ortony (ed.), Metaphor and Thought ( Cambridge 1979), 78 ff. His discussion differs from mine in many details, though I follow his basic strategy of analysis, 86 ff.
10.
Van Dijk, op.cit. 94.
11.
Cf. van Dijk on condition consequence orderings, op.cit 105.
13.
Beaugrande, op.cit. 163 ff., giving references to the relevant literature. This corresponds in some degree to van Dijk's argument that we may order the facts within a frame along cause--consequence, general-particular, and whole-part lines, op.cit. 99.
14.
Halliday, op.cit. 137.

-137-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Interpretation, Deconstruction, and Ideology: An Introduction to Some Current Issues in Literary Theory
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1 - Implication 1
  • 2.1 - Metaphor in the Text 8
  • 2.2 - Metaphor in the Language 19
  • 3.1 - Linguistics and Interpretation 26
  • 3.2 'Leda and the Swan'; Three Approaches 36
  • 4 - The Text and the External World 46
  • 5.1 - Deconstruction and Scepticism 60
  • 5.2 - Ambiguity and Self-Contradiction 66
  • 5.3 - Free Play 77
  • 5.4 - Norms for Interpretation 83
  • 6.1 - Ideology and Opposition 94
  • 6.2 - Hidden Ideology 103
  • 6.3 - Marxism and the Dominant Ideology 110
  • 6.4 - The Moral and the Political 121
  • Notes 137
  • Bibliography 154
  • Index 157
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 180

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.