Lincoln's Fifth Wheel: the Political History of the United States Sanitary Commission

By William Quentin Maxwell; Allan Nevins | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
The Soldier and the Sanitary Commission, 1861

- 1 -

THE need for men created abuses in the enlistments of 1861. A recruiting agent without scruples would fill up regimental quotas with the unfit. Doctors erroneously believed that volunteers did not have to meet standards set up for the regular army. Physical examinations varied from state to state; in southern Ohio they involved "little more than opening and shutting the hands, bending the elbows and knees, rotating the shoulder joint, with a casual glance at the teeth and eyes and a question as to age and previous general health." In Washington the army canceled the May order to re-examine the volunteers, apparently for fear of losing too many three-month enlistments. A general order in August directed the examination of all recruits, but surgeons generally ignored it. As general secretary of the Sanitary Commission, Olmsted asked Northern governors to keep high standards, because the army wanted men capable of withstanding privations, fatigue, and exposure; those who became disheartened on losing a meal or fell ill for want of domestic comforts and tender care did violence to the army's idea of what soldiers ought to be--"sound, tough, enduring, and long suffering."

Faith in numbers alone was a delusion enjoyed by the uninitiated. Tyros at arms quickly learned that real power did not come from indiscriminate selection; 60 healthy animals in fighting trim would give better performance than if their ranks had been swollen to 110 by the addition of 50 sickly men. The unfit depressed the vigorous by the weariness and

-31-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lincoln's Fifth Wheel: the Political History of the United States Sanitary Commission
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 372

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.