The Rural Economy of New England: A Regional Study

By John Donald Black | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
The People of New England

Let us now proceed to obtain what true facts and understanding we can from the foregoing records as to the people of New England, their numbers, distribution, and composition, and how these have come to be what they are. Chart 1 of Chapter 2 showed the general distribution of population of New England, and of adjacent parts of neighboring states and of Canada. Chart 11 accompanying shows in more detail the distribution within New England itself. The size of the circles indicates the relative size of the cities; the dots the relative density of the rural population. Almost without any population appear the "wild land" area in northern Maine, a smaller tract almost as wild in southeastern Maine, the White Mountains area of northern New Hampshire and extending into Essex County in Vermont, and limited stretches of the Green and Taconic Mountains in Vermont. The Eastern and Western Highland territory averages from 1 to 15 inhabitants per square mile except for occasional urban towns; likewise some territory in southeastern Maine and central New Hampshire that may be designated as the "farmforest margin." The distinctly farming areas of New England, located in northern Vermont and south central to southeastern Maine, once devoted to general farming, now more largely to dairying than anything else, mostly average from 15 to 30 inhabitants per square mile. The rural areas dominated by cities -- eastern Connecticut, all of eastern Massachusetts, the Connecticut Valley well up into Massachusetts -- have a population of from 30 to 75 per square mile, and even more close to cities. By no means is all of this population agricultural.

The urban population of New England, and most of the appendant "rural" population, is focused about the two metropolitan centers, New York and Boston. We shall later discover that this fact furnishes the basis for much of the structure of rural land values in New England. The census of 1940

-66-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Rural Economy of New England: A Regional Study
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 796

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.