West Virginia, the Mountain State

By Charles H. Ambler; Festus P. Summers | Go to book overview

Chapter XX
West Virginia The Thirty-Fifth State

THE LAUNCHING

IN COMPLIANCE with the "Ordinance for the Organization of the State of West Virginia" adopted by the Constitutional Convention, a nominating convention of 235 delegates of the Constitutional Union party met in Parkersburg, May 6-7, 1863, to name candidates for eight elective state offices, including three judges of the state supreme court of appeals.1 The Constitutional Convention had set the election for the Thursday next succeeding the thirty-fifth day from the date of the President's proclamation of West Virginia's admission to statehood, which fell on May 28. Though it labored under some apprehension, due to the reported presence in the neighborhood of raiding Confederates, led by General William E. Jones, the nominating convention named Arthur I. Boreman of Wood County for governor; Samuel Crane of Randolph County for auditor; Campbell Tarr of Brooke County for treasurer; Aquilla B. Caldwell of Ohio County for attorney general; Jacob E. Boyers of Tyler County for secretary of state; and James H. Brown of Kanawha County, William A. Harrison of Harrison County, and Ralph L. Berkshire of Monongalia County for the supreme court of appeals.

Except that all but three of these nominees, Tarr, Brown, and Harrison, were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, they were representative of all sections and factions. Four of them, Boreman, Caldwell, Berkshire, and Harrison, had been Whigs, and the others were Jackson Demo- crats who had voted for Douglas. By a vote ranging from about 24,000 to

____________________
1
Wheeling Intelligencer, May 7, 1863; May 8, 1863.

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