West Virginia, the Mountain State

By Charles H. Ambler; Festus P. Summers | Go to book overview

Chapter XXV
The Shrinking of Distance

TRANSPORTATION

ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO present West Virginia was crossed in easterly and westerly directions by four turnpikes: the Cumberland, or National, connecting Cumberland, Maryland, and Wheeling by way of Washington, Pennsylvania; the James River and Kanawha connecting Lewisburg and Guyandotte by way of "Mouth of Gauley" and Charleston; the "Old Northwestern" connecting Romney and Parkersburg via Grafton, Clarksburg, and West Union; and the Staunton and Parkersburg via Beverly, Buckhannon, and Weston. The Virginia turnpikes were built under the initial direction of Colonel Claudius Crozet, a French artillery officer who had served with Napoleon, and were masterpieces of engineering.1 They were connected by a network of turnpikes and dirt roads which, like the main thoroughfares, spanned rivers and creeks by the use of "S-bridges" and "covered bridges." Where these were impracticable, crossings were by ferries, the sites of which grew into towns and cities. The main thoroughfares were generally macadamed, thus making them usable the year round and permitting the substitution of the stagecoach for the heavier and more cumbersome Conestoga wagon.

Trans-Allegheny Virginia was then in the stagecoach state of its transportation history. But the area served by the first roads was not destitute economically, socially, and politically. In due course, hunters' cabins and farmhouses were converted into hostelries, inns, taverns and health resorts where statesmen, scientists, authors, and travelers of both low and high estate were entertained after a fashion befitting their respective stations. Here polite greetings were exchanged, politics were discussed, the past was retold, and nuptial matches were made. The best hostelries made a

____________________
1
Colonel William Couper, Claudius Cozet ( Charlottesville, Va., 1936), pp. 36-67, 73-92.

-330-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
West Virginia, the Mountain State
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 586

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.