Christianity in South Africa: An Annotated Bibliography

By David Chidester; Judy Tobler et al. | Go to book overview

2 Christian Missions

The landmark text in the historiography of South African Christian missions was written not by a missiologist, a theologian, a historian, or an anthropologist but by a political activist. Adopting the pseudonym Nosipho Majeke, Dora Taylor published The Role of the Missionaries in Conquest in 1952 as a scathing indictment of the missionary project ( Majeke, 1952). More political tract than historical research, the text's sustained linkage of missionary activity with European conquest, commerce, and colonialism nevertheless marked a turning point in debates about the Christian mission. Prior to this point, the history of the mission could be told as a triumphalist narrative of the progress of the Christian gospel in South Africa. Beginning with the first general history by J. du Plessis ( 1911), the story of the Christian mission could be told, in the title of Charles Pelham Groves classic work, as a history of the "planting of Christianity in Africa" ( Groves, 1948- 1959). It was a history of African "improvement" and of Christian "development" under the influence of heroic Europeans, the "blessed missionaries" ( Eiselen, 1934; Smith, 1950). Certainly, missiologists could continue to tell that story. For example, in 1958 G. B. A. Gerdener updated Du Plessis' History of Christian Missions in South Africa to demonstrate the "restraining and directing influence of the Christian religion" in leading Africans on the path of "evolution from primitive ceremonies and customs to a civilized form of government" ( Gerdener, 1958). However, that story could no longer be taken seriously as an historical account.

Three phases can be identified in the subsequent history of missions. First, social theory was introduced into the analysis of what Bertram Hutchinson called, in an article published in 1957 that anticipated the direction that historical studies would increasingly adopt in the 1970s, the "social consequences of nineteenth-century missionary activity" ( Hutchinson, 1957). In assessing its

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Christianity in South Africa: An Annotated Bibliography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - Christianity in South Africa 1
  • References 13
  • 2 - Christian Missions 17
  • 3 - Christian Denominations 193
  • 4 - African Initiated Churches 323
  • Index 453
  • About the Authors 491
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 494

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.