The Learned Presidency: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, Woodrow Wilson

By David H. Burton | Go to book overview

2
WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT Legal Mind

William Howard Taft--the one man to be both president and chief justice--has a secure place in American history. Only occasionally, and perhaps unfortunately, have ex-presidents remained politically active to the point of holding important public office: John Quincy Adams represented his district of Massachusetts in the lower house of the Congress after being president; Andrew Johnson was reelected to the Senate, though he did not live long enough to take his seat; and Herbert Hoover made a singular contribution at the head of the commission that bore his name and that helped to reorganize the federal government. Taft did much more. After four years in the White House he was appointed to the Supreme Court of the United States as chief justice in 1921 and presided over the Court for a decade. Some might contend that in passing to the Court he had taken a higher place. More than one respected voice--JusticeOliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., among them--has been raised to argue that service on the Supreme Court is the supreme public achievement. Certainly Taft expressed himself in such terms from time to time, which is not to suggest that he contemned the presidency. He thought of himself, rather, as better suited to be a jurist than an executive. Such judgments, after all, are a matter of individual temperament, taste, and training, which in Taft's case combine to explain his preference for the judiciary. His heritage, education, and early experiences were of the law, his inclinations and ambitions were judicial, and his learning was the offspring of these kindred elements.1

Insofar as his writings are evidence of Taft's learning, they fall into three categories. His judicial philosophy is readily identified from his decisions both as a state judge and a federal jurist and from his Supreme Court opinions written during the 1920s.2 His several books and other extended observations on government and especially on the presidency show Taft to

-89-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Learned Presidency: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, Woodrow Wilson
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 5
  • Contents 9
  • Acknowledgments 10
  • Preface 11
  • Prologue 19
  • 1 - Theodore Roosevelt Learned Style 38
  • 2 - William Howard Taft Legal Mind 89
  • 3 - Woodrow Wilson Righteous Scholar 136
  • Epilogue 193
  • Notes 200
  • Select Bibliography 213
  • Index 218
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 228

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.