Sentinel under Siege: The Triumphs and Troubles of America's Free Press

By Stanley E. Flink | Go to book overview

13
THE FIRST AND THE FOURTEENTH

If human nature is utterly corrupted, no government is possible. If we are, as Rousseau would have it, natively good, no government is necessary. It's the middle ground where human nature is a damaged piece of goods and where you say, "I can know the good but not do it," that calls for the restraints of government, either by imposition or by contract.

-- S. J. Timothy Healy, former president, Georgetown University; president, New York Public Library

The significance of the Fourteenth Amendment, enacted in 1868, so far as freedom of the press is concerned found its roots in the Zenger trial of 1735 and had to evolve (as already described) through a number of Supreme Court cases in the twentieth century to become full grown. The most commonly held view was and is that the Fourteenth Amendment rectified the flaw in the Bill of Rights that had been imposed by the Senate's rejection of Madison's separate proposal giving supremacy to the federal Bill of Rights over any action by state legislatures affecting the rights of individual citizens. Some scholars, however, feel that the evidence for such a view is inconclusive.

There was little doubt, however, that interpretation of the Constitution and the amendments reached its apogee before the Supreme Court. Whatever the Court decided became the law -- unless, as Lincoln vowed, it was changed by the people through their representatives or by amendment. During the 1920s and 1930s the decisions of the Supreme Court began the movement toward "incorporating" the First Amendment rights -- speech, press, petition, and assembly -- into the "privileges and immunities" and the "equal protection of the laws" described in the Fourteenth Amendment. The abolitionist leaders, including the clergy, had seen freedom of speech and press as inseparable from the issue of slavery. Early in the nineteenth century, slaveowner states were more sharply aware than ever of the danger

-149-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sentinel under Siege: The Triumphs and Troubles of America's Free Press
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 325

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.