Jazz in Black and White: Race, Culture, and Identity in the Jazz Community

By Charley Gerard | Go to book overview

Selected Bibliography

RACE & JAZZ

Carter Sandy. "Jazz Race." Z Magazine ( February 1995).

Collier James Lincoln. Jazz: The American Theme Song. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993.

Hentoff Nat. "Race Prejudice in Jazz: It Works Both Ways." Harper's Magazine ( June 1959).

_____. "The Murderous Modes of Jazz." Esquire ( September 15, 1960).

Horowitz Irving Louis, and Charles Nanry. "Ideologies and Theories About American Jazz." Journal of Jazz Studies 2, No. 2 ( June 1975).

Jones James T IV. "Racism and Jazz: Same as It Ever Was . . . or Worse?" Jazz Times ( March 1995).

Kinnon Joy Bennett. "Are Whites Taking or Are Blacks Giving Away the Blues?" Ebony ( September 1997).

Lees Gene. Cats of Any Color: Jazz, Black and White. New York: Oxford University Press, 1994.

Olsher Dean, moderator. Jazz Musicians Discuss Racism in the Jazz World. National Public Radio two-part series ( January, 1996)

Peretti Burton W. The Creation of Jazz: Music, Race, and Culture in Urban America. Urbana, Ill.: University of Illinois Press, 1992.

Radamo Ronald M. New Musical Figurations: Anthony Braxton's Cultural Critique. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1993.

-189-

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Jazz in Black and White: Race, Culture, and Identity in the Jazz Community
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1 - Black Music, Black Identity 1
  • 2 - African Music, African Identity 39
  • 3 - Race and Religious Identity 73
  • 4 - Race and Jazz Communities 83
  • 5 - Black Music, White Identity 97
  • 6 - Colorless Swing 117
  • 7 - Racial Identity and Three Lives 127
  • 8 - Racial Identity Embedded in Performance 153
  • 9 - The Right of Swing 165
  • Notes 171
  • Selected Bibliography 189
  • Index 195
  • About the Author *
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