Keepers of the Spirits: The Judicial Response to Prohibition Enforcement in Florida, 1885-1935

By John J. Guthrie Jr. | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
For a deeper discussion of this literature, see Paul Johnson, "Bottoms Up: Drinking, Temperance, and the Social Historians", Reviews in American History 13 ( March 1985), 45-53; Jedd Dannenbaum, "Crusade Against Drink", Reviews in American History 9 ( December 1981), 498-500; Joseph Kett, "Temperance and Intemperance as Historical Problem", Journal of American History 67 ( March 1981), 878-879; Charles W. Eagles, "Urban-Rural Conflict in the 1920s: A Historiographical Assessment", Historian 49 ( November 1986), 26-48; Mark Edward Lender, "The Historian and Repeal: A Survey of the Literature and Research Opportunities", in David E. Kyvig , ed., Law, Alcohol, and Order ( Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1985), 177-205. For specific literature on prohibition in the South, see Richard L. Watson Jr., "From Populism through the New Deal: Southern Political History", in John B. Boles and Evelyn Thomas Nolen, eds., Interpreting Southern History: Historiographical Essays in Honor of Sanford W. Higginbotham ( Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1987), 308-389, esp. 347-350; Dewey W. Grantham, Southern Progressivism: The Reconciliation of Progress and Tradition, 2nd ed. ( Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1987), 160-177.
2.
In addition to the works cited throughout the text, see also Rayman L. Solomon, "Regulating the Regulators: Prohibition Enforcement in the Seventh Circuit", in Kyvig, ed., Law, Alcohol and Order, 81-96; Harry G. Levine, "The Birth of American Alcohol Control: Prohibition, the Power Elite, and the Problem of Lawlessness", Contemporary Drug Problems (Spring 1985), 63-115; John F. Padgett, "Plea Bargaining and Prohibition in the Federal Courts, 1908-1934", Law and Society Review 24 ( 1990), 413-450.
3.
William F. Holmes, "Moonshining and Collective Violence: Georgia, 1889- 1895", Journal of American History67 ( December 1980), 589-611, 603, 610. See also Joel W. Williamson, ed., An Appalachian Symposium ( Boone, N.C.: Appalachian Consortium Press, 1977); William Lynwood Montell, Killings: Folk Justice in the Upper South ( Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1986).
4.
Wilbur R. Miller, Revenuers & Moonshiners: Enforcing Federal Law in the Mountain South, 1865-1900 ( Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1991), 4, 108-109; Idem, "The Revenue: Federal Law Enforcement in the Mountain South, 1870-1900", Journal of Southern History 55 ( May 1989), 195-216.
5.
Stephen Cresswell, Mormons & Cowboys, Moonshiners & Klansmen: Federal Law Enforcement in the South and West, 1870-1893 ( Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1991), 16, 264.
6.
The best state studies include Robert Smith Boder, Prohibition in Kansas: A History ( Lawrence: University of Kansas Press, 1986); Jimmie Lewis Franklin, Born Sober: Prohibition in Oklahoma, 1907-1959 ( Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1971); Paul E. Isaac, Prohibition and Politics: Turbulent Decades in Tennessee, 1885- 1920 ( Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1965); Daniel J. Whitener, Prohibition in North Carolina, 1717-1945 ( Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1945); James Benson Sellers, The Prohibition Movement in Alabama, 1702-1943 ( Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1943); Edwin Hendricks, Liquor and Anti-Liquor in Virginia, 1619-1919 ( Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1967).
7.
These concepts are defined in Kermit L. Hall, The Magic Mirror: Law in American History ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1989), 94, 114, 361; see also

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Keepers of the Spirits: The Judicial Response to Prohibition Enforcement in Florida, 1885-1935
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction: Historians and the Liquor Laws 1
  • Notes 10
  • Selected Bibliography 141
  • Index 157
  • About the Author *
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