Fools and Jesters in Literature, Art, and History: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook

By Vicki K. Janik; Emmanuel S. Nelson | Go to book overview

as well as Dogberry, the cobbler in Julius Caesar ( 1602), Lavatch in All's Well That Ends Well (c. 1602), Pompey in Measure for Measure ( 1604), the Gravedigger in Hamlet, the drunken porter in Macbeth ( 1606), and Sir Epicure Mammon in Ben Jonson The Alchemist ( 1610), literary historians would do well to explore more fully his own oeuvre. For it is here, buried in the pages of his mostly forgotten texts, that the sources of his influence lie.


NOTES
1
Included among these critics and historians are Emma Marshall Denkinger and Austin K. Gray. J. A. B. Somerset (68-82) offers a contradictory view.
2
Much recent work has been done on anxiety and its various manifestations in Elizabethan and Jacobean culture, including its concomitant representations on the London stage. These include Paul Brown " This Thing of Darkness I Acknowledge Mine': The Tempest and the Discourse of Colonialism, in Political Shakespeare: New Essays in Cultural Materialism, ed. Jonathan Dollimore and Alan Sinfield ( Ithaca, NY: Cornell UP, 1985), 48-72; and Stephen Greenblatt "Martial Law in the Land of Cockaigne", in Shakespearean Negotiations ( Berkeley: U of California P, 1988), 129-165.
3
For further discussion of the politics and/or patronage of English Renaissance theater, see Raymond Williams, The Country and the City ( New York: Oxford UP, 1973); Daniel Javitch, Poetry and Courtliness in Renaissance England ( Princeton: Princeton UP, 1978); Jonathan Goldberg, James I and the Politics of Literature ( Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1983); Catherine Belsey, The Subject of Tragedy: Identity and Difference in Renaissance Drama ( London and New York: Routledge, 1993); Jonathan Dollimore and Alan Sinfield, eds., Political Shakespeare: New Essays in Cultural Materialism ( Ithaca, NY: Cornell UP, 1985); Stephen Greenblatt, ed., Representing the English Renaissance ( Berkeley: U of California P, 1988); Cedric C. Brown, ed., Patronage, Politics, and Literary Traditions in England, 1558-1658 ( Detroit: Wayne State UP, 1993); and David Scott Kastan and Peter Stallybrass, eds., Staging the Renaissance: Reinterpretations of Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama ( London and New York: Routledge, 1991).
4
Mikhail Bakhtin, "Introduction" to Rabelais and His World ( 1968), trans. Hélène Iswolsky ( Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1984). All references to this text are cited parenthetically.
5
The quotation from The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark is taken from G. B. Harrison , ed., Shakespeare: The Complete Works ( New York: Harcourt, Brace & World, 1968).

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

Primary Sources

"R. Armin in praise and commendation of this briefe Resolution of a right religion". 1590. In The Works of Robert Armin, Actor (1605-1609), ed. Alexander B. Grosart . Manchester, 1880. x-xi.

Foole upon Foole, or Six sortes of Sottes. 1600; 2nd led., 1605. Ann Arbor: University Microfilms, 1970.

-48-

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