Murder Most Rare: The Female Serial Killer

By Michael D. Kelleher; C. L. Kelleher | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

In 1991, Jeffrey Dahmer went on trial for multiple counts of homicide. He had callously murdered at least seventeen boys and young men in the four years preceding his capture. Each of Dahmer's victims had been sexually attacked, brutally tortured, and killed. Many of the bodies of his victims had been savagely mutilated and used for his sexual pleasure long after they had succumbed to a horrible death. Dahmer's pathological and unspeakable, selfproclaimed purpose had been to create "sex zombies" who would be forever at his command. Thirty years earlier, between 1962 and 1964, Albert Henry DeSalvo, who came to be known in the press as the Boston Strangler, murdered at least thirteen women who ranged in age from nineteen to eighty-five years. Eleven of his victims had been sexually assaulted; most died by strangulation, and their bodies had been desecrated and placed in bizarre positions after they were slain. By his own admission, DeSalvo was a man who knew no limits to his compulsive drive to rape for the two years during which he terrorized the Boston area. The Clown Killer, John Wayne Gacy, murdered thirty-three young males between 1972 and 1978. After luring the victims to his home, Gacy would ply them with alcohol and drugs, and eventually, use handcuffs to subdue them. He would then attack them sexually. Following their torture and death, Gacy would bury the bodies of his victims on his own property. After concealing twenty-nine bodies in the crawl space beneath his home and underneath his cement driveway, Gacy found that he had run out of space. He solved the problem by throwing the bodies of his last four victims into the Des Plaines River.

The list of infamous serial killers who have roamed the United States in the past few decades is frightening. Men with monikers like the Night Stalker, the Trailside Killer, the 1-5 Killer, and the Son of Sam have become recognizable to even casual readers of the true crime genre. These men

-ix-

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Murder Most Rare: The Female Serial Killer
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1 - The Quiet Killers 1
  • Notes 17
  • 2 - Black Windows 19
  • Notes 57
  • 3 - Angles of Death 59
  • Notes 70
  • 4 - Sexual Predators 73
  • Notes 83
  • 5 - Revenge 85
  • Notes 91
  • 6 - For Profit or Crime 93
  • Notes 106
  • 7 - Team Killers 107
  • 8 - The Question of Sanity 161
  • Notes 172
  • 9 - The Unexplained 173
  • Notes 187
  • 10 - The Unsolved 189
  • Notes 196
  • Appendix 1 - Statistical Information 197
  • Appendix 2 - Alphabetical Listing of Female Serial Killers 199
  • Appendix 3 - Munchausen Syndrome By Proxy 201
  • Selected Bibliography 205
  • Index 209
  • About the Authors 214
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