Murder Most Rare: The Female Serial Killer

By Michael D. Kelleher; C. L. Kelleher | Go to book overview

sometimes quite active in repeated acts of sexual homicide. Because the crimes of team killers tend to be flagrant and impulsive, the period of lethal activity of these perpetrators is relatively short compared to murders committed by other types of female serial killers.

In general, female serial murderers can be profiled in two, somewhat discrete categories. The perpetrator who acts alone will often be mature, careful, deliberate, socially adept, and highly organized; she will tend to attack in a secretive manner, using a method that is difficult for law enforcement personnel to quickly identify. On the other hand, the female perpetrator who is a member of a killing team will often prove to be younger, aggressive, vicious in her attack, sometimes disorganized, and usually unable to carefully plan her murders. The perpetrator who acts alone will usually attack her victims in her home, their home, or her place of work, whereas the female member of a killing team will attack her victims in diverse locations as the opportunity for murder presents itself. Female serial killers who operate alone tend to favor weapons or methods such as poison, lethal injection, or suffocation, whereas members of a killing team will often use much more violent means, such as shooting, stabbing, or physical torture.

Regardless of the similarities that may seem apparent among the known incidents of serial murder committed by women, there is no reliable profile of this perpetrator. As the case histories in this book will show, the female serial killer is a complex and diverse criminal who murders for a variety of reasons and in many different ways. Although her presence and impact have long been overlooked by researchers and law enforcement personnel, the female serial murderer is a criminal of surprising complexity and unquestioned lethality.


NOTES
1.
David Lester, Serial Killers: The Insatiable Passion ( Philadelphia: Charles Press, 1995), 29.
5.
Robert K. Ressler, Ann W. Burgess, and John E. Douglas, Sexual Homicide: Patterns and Motives ( New York: Lexington, 1988), 122-123.

-17-

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Murder Most Rare: The Female Serial Killer
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1 - The Quiet Killers 1
  • Notes 17
  • 2 - Black Windows 19
  • Notes 57
  • 3 - Angles of Death 59
  • Notes 70
  • 4 - Sexual Predators 73
  • Notes 83
  • 5 - Revenge 85
  • Notes 91
  • 6 - For Profit or Crime 93
  • Notes 106
  • 7 - Team Killers 107
  • 8 - The Question of Sanity 161
  • Notes 172
  • 9 - The Unexplained 173
  • Notes 187
  • 10 - The Unsolved 189
  • Notes 196
  • Appendix 1 - Statistical Information 197
  • Appendix 2 - Alphabetical Listing of Female Serial Killers 199
  • Appendix 3 - Munchausen Syndrome By Proxy 201
  • Selected Bibliography 205
  • Index 209
  • About the Authors 214
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