Community and Political Thought Today

By Peter Augustine Lawler; Dale McConkey | Go to book overview

A liberal society we are, but if we cannot handle degradation of the moral environment well within liberal norms, then more fundamental challenges may follow.


NOTES
1
Tony Hillerman, Coyote Waits ( New York: Harper Paperbacks, 1990).
2
Bauer's statement is contained in an article entitled "The Moral Ecosystem," Focus on the Family Citizen newsletter ( March 18, 1991); Charon comes from a syndicated column, Daily Oklahoman, July 7, 1993. See Medved Hollywood Versus America ( New York: HarperCollins, 1992) on his diagnosis of video pollution; the specific quotation from Patrick Buchanan was cited in Christian Science Monitor, May 17, 1993, 3.
3
See Robert Bellah, Richard Madsen, William M. Sullivan, Ann Swidler, and Steven M. Tipton, Habits of the Heart (Revised edition. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1996); numerous works by Christopher Lasch, including: "Capitalism vs. Cultural Conservatism?" First Things ( April 1990), 15-23; The True and Only Heaven: Progress and Its Critics ( New York: Norton, 1991); Culture of Narcissism ( New York: Norton, 1991); Haven in a Heartless World: The Family Besieged ( New York: Basic Books, 1979); and Daniel Bell , The Cultural Contradictions of Capitalism ( New York: Basic Books, 1976).
4
See Amatai Etzioni, The Spirit of Community ( New York: Crown, 1993); Mary Ann Glendon , Rights Talk ( New York: Free Press, 1991), and Jean Bethke Elshtain, Democracy on Trial ( New York: Basic Books, 1995).
5
See Robert Putnam, Making Democracy Work ( Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1993); and "Bowling Alone: America's Declining Social Capital," Journal of Democracy 6 ( January 1995): 65-78; "Tuning In, Tuning Out: The Strange Disappearance of Social Capital in America," PS: Political Science & Politics 38 ( December 1995): 664- 683.
6
See especially the works of Andrea Dworkin, Pornography: Men Possessing Women ( New York: Plume, 1989); and Catharine MacKinnon, Only Words ( Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1993).
7
See Allen D. Hertzke, Echoes of Discontent ( Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly Press, 1993), chapter 3.
8
On the epistemology of the scientific method we draw upon Karl R. Popper, The Logic of Scientific Discovery ( New York: Basic Books, 1959), and Objective Knowledge: An Evolutionary Approach ( Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1972). Popper stressed the importance of asserting falsifiable propositions or implications of a theory, the lack of which has doomed certain grand theories. In addition, he stressed that theories are better and deeper when they both encompass and surpass prior theories in relatively elegant and parsimonious fashion. The moral ecology appears to do just that, as it encompasses a number of theories from diverse fields that have attempted to explain the way media violence, gambling promotion, and normative change in the culture affect human responses.
9
David Easton, The Political System: An Inquiry into the State of Political Science, second edition ( New York: Knopf, 1971). Easton's criticism of hyper-factualism has been addressed since his writing. But his implicit criticism of timid theorizing that never rises above the middle level remains prescient.
10
See Gary King, Robert Keohane, and Sidney Verba, Designing Social Inquiry: Scientific Inference in Qualitative Research ( Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1994),

-20-

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