Community and Political Thought Today

By Peter Augustine Lawler; Dale McConkey | Go to book overview

eral structure is always the institutional expression of the contradiction or tension between the particular reasons the member units have for remaining small and autonomous but not wholly, and large and consolidated but not quite."14 This puts it exactly right, and makes it clear why we should never wish to see these tensions finally resolved. To leave them unresolved, and thereby leave institutional space for the very kinds of associations that today's communitarians claim to cherish, is precisely the genius of federalism, properly understood. Hence it behooves our communitarians, and everyone else besides, to give the federal idea a fresh look.


NOTES
1..
See, for example, Michael J. Sandel, Liberalism and the Limits of Justice ( New York: Cambridge University Press, 1982); and Liberalism and Its Critics ( New York: New York University Press, 1984).
2.
Robert Nisbet, The Quest for Community: A Study in the Ethics of Order and Freedom ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1953).
3.
Hillary Rodham Clinton It Takes a Village; and Other Lessons Children Teach Us ( New York: Simon and Schuster, 1996).
4.
Michael J. Sandel, Democracy's Discontent: America in Search of a Public Philosophy ( Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1996).
5.
Richard John Neuhaus, The Naked Public Square: Religion and Democracy in America, 2d ed. ( Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1984).
6.
See Wilfred M. McClay, "A More Perfect Union? Toward a New Federalism", Commentary 100 ( September 1995): 28-33; and "The Soul of Man Under Federalism", First Things, No. 64 (June/ July 1996): 21-26.
7.
Clinton Rossiter, ed., The Federalist Papers ( New York: Mentor, 1961), 246.
8.
Martin Diamond, "The Ends of Federalism", As Far as Republican Principles Will Admit: Essays by Martin Diamond, edited by W. Schambra ( Washington, DC: AEI Press, 1992), 152-166.
9.
Herbert Storing, What the Anti-Federalists Were For ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1981), 3-6.
11.
There is an immense literature on republicanism in early America. A sampling of some of the more useful essays, by way of introduction, would include: Willi Paul Adams, "Republicanism in Political Rhetoric before 1776", Political Science Quarterly 85 ( 1970): 397-421; Joyce Appleby, ed., "Republicanism in the History and Historiography of the United States", American Quarterly 37 ( 1985): 461-598; James Kloppenberg, "The Virtues of Liberalism: Christianity, Republicanism, and Ethics in Early American Political Discourse", Journal of American History 74 ( 1987): 9-33; and Daniel T. Rodgers, "Republicanism: The Career of a Concept", Journal of American History 79 ( 1992): 11-39. In addition to the classic works of Bernard Bailyn, Gordon Wood, and J. G.A. Pocock, one should consult Paul Rahe, Republics Ancient and Modern: Classical Republicanism and the American Revolution ( Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1992).
12.
J. G.A. Pocock, The Machiavellian Moment: Florentine Political Thought and the Atlantic Republican Tradition ( Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1975).
13.
Glenn Tinder, "Alone for Others", First Things No. 62 ( April 1996): 8-10.
14.
Diamond, "The Ends of Federalism", 145.

-107-

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