Understanding Society, Culture, and Television

By Paul Monaco | Go to book overview

formula. Go anywhere in the country, from Portland, Maine, to Portland, Oregon, from Miami to Malibu, and turn on the local news at 10:00 or 11:00 p.m. Wherever you are, you can set your watch to the time that the weather will be reported or the day's sports will be summarized.

Does TVs' reliance upon repetition hearken the emergence of a new human consciousness that is beckoning different people into an electronic global village in which they feel a genuine kinship to one another?5 Does the fact that repetition defined ancient rites, rituals, myths, and legends mean that increasing numbers of us will connect with deeper yearnings of our minds and souls that are ancestral? Or does the idea of repetition, confronting us day in and day out on our TV sets, mark a further erosion of authentic community, hence condemning each of us to greater feelings of alienation? Does the idea of repetition compel us toward undiscriminating and mindless imitation of some centrally generated message? Or does TV beckon a wonderfully rich and full democratization of culture and society that is spreading to nearly every corner of the globe by leaps and bounds? All these questions are upon us. Today's arguments about television have sharpened our attention to any number of issues hotly debated since the late nineteenth century. What I see now, however, are increasing attempts to answer just such questions about modernization and change with reference to television itself. And I find these attempts to be highly speculative, imprecise, and misleading.


NOTES
1.
I am indebted to the late Robert Plant Armstrong, my colleague in Aesthetic Studies at the University of Texas at Dallas, who exchanged with me so many ideas about aesthetics. His own three books on the subject are Wellspring, The Powers of Presence, and The Affecting Presence.
2.
For a good description of this, see Parker Tyler, Magic and Myth of the Movies ( New York: H. Holt & Co., 1947).
3.
See, J. Dudley Andrew, The Major Film Theories ( Oxford/ New York: Oxford University Press, 1976). Still one of the best summaries of the thinking that formed the idea of the director as author, Andrew clarifies that this idea is not so much a theory as a "critical method." Critic Andrew Sarris most often is credited for introducing the auteur idea in the United States. For my views on the matter, see Paul Monaco, Ribbons in Time: Movies and Society Since 1945 ( Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1987), pp. 34 ff.
4.
For an excellent discussion of Macdonald's ideas in this context, see Hal Himmelstein , On the Small Screen: New Approaches in Television and Video

-25-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Understanding Society, Culture, and Television
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 144

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.