In the Footsteps of the Masters: Desmond M. Tutu and Abel T. Muzorewa

By Dickson A. Mungazi | Go to book overview

Huddleston fumed, "Apartheid was not a political mistake, it was a fundamentally evil system."42 The recognition of this legacy is what Desmond M. Tutu took into account as he picked up the baton from Huddleston and carried his part of the race against apartheid.


NOTES
1
Brian Bunting, "Origins of Apartheid", in Alec La Guma (ed.), Apartheid: A Collection of Writings on South Africa by South Africans ( New York: International Publishers, 1971), p. 23.
3
Leo Marquard, The People and Policies of South Africa ( London: Oxford University Press, 1969), p. 221.
5
When the author was in high school in 1957, he heard a story told about Malan and how he became a preacher in NGK. It was said that before he became a minister he became very sick and went into a coma. After he recovered he began to preach about the beauty of heaven. At a news conference soon after, he was asked if he saw Africans in heaven. Malan looked surprised at the question and responded, "No, I did not go to the kitchen, that is where Natives stay."
6
Marquard, The People and Policies of South Africa, p. 231.
10
History notes that the Catholic Church condemned this book because it was considerd too revolutionary, forcing Rousseau to seek refuge in Britain where he was protected for expressing his views of society.
11
For details see Dickson A. Mungazi, The Last Defenders of the Laager: Ian D. Smith and F. W. de Klerk ( Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers, 1998).
12
Stardake Samkange, What Rhodes Really Said About Africans ( Harare: Harare Publishing House, 1982), p. 27.
13
Quoted in Marquard, The People and Policies of South Africa, p. 229.
14
Robert Buis, Religious Beliefs and White Prejudice ( Johannesburg: Raven Press, 1975), p. 9.
15
Jim Wallis and Joyce Holleyday (eds.), Crucible of Fire: The Church Confronts Apartheid ( Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1989), p. 104.
17
Marquard, The People and Policies of South Africa, p. 231.
19
Bunting, "Origins of Apartheid", p. 25.
20
Allister Sparks, The Mind of South Africa ( New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1989), p. 188.
21
Alan Paton, Cry, the Beloved Country ( New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1948), p. 102.
23
Sparks, The Mind of South Africa, p. 188.
24
A. B. Xuma served as president of the ANC from 1940 to 1949. A dedicated

-37-

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In the Footsteps of the Masters: Desmond M. Tutu and Abel T. Muzorewa
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Role of the Church In South Africa and the Legacy of Trevor Huddleston 19
  • Notes 37
  • 2 - The Role of the Church In Zimbabwe and the Legacy of Ralph E. Dodge 39
  • Notes 57
  • 3 - Tutu's South Africa and Muzorewa's Zimbabwe Compared 61
  • Notes 81
  • 4 - Desmond M. Tutu: The Man And His Mission 85
  • Notes 105
  • 5 - Abel T. Muzorewa: The Man and His Mission 109
  • Notes 126
  • 6 - Tutu's Role in the Political Transformation of South Africa 129
  • Notes 147
  • 7 - Muzorewa's Role in The Political Transformation of Zimbabwe 149
  • Notes 172
  • 8 - Tutu and Muzorewa in the Footsteps of the Masters: Summary, Conclusion, and Implications 175
  • Notes 203
  • Selected Bibliography 207
  • Index 219
  • About the Author *
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