In the Footsteps of the Masters: Desmond M. Tutu and Abel T. Muzorewa

By Dickson A. Mungazi | Go to book overview

NOTES
1
Leo Marquard, The People and Policies of South Africa ( London: Oxford University Press, 1969) p. 145.
3
South Africa, Official Yearbook ( Pretoria: Government Printer, 1982), p. 42.
6
These colonies were Tanganyika, South-West Africa ( Namibia), Rwanda, Burundi, and Cameroon. Germany had acquired them as a result of the partition of Africa effected at the Berlin conference from December 1884 to February 1885. Germany never reacquired these colonies.
7
South Africa, Official Yearbook, p. 46.
8
Thomas Kevin and Gwendolen M. Carter (eds.), From Protest to Challenge: A Documentary History of African Politics in South Africa, 1852-1964 (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1972), p. 127.
10
Smuts served as prime minister of South Africa for two terms, from 1919 to 1924, and from 1939 to 1948. Other leaders were Louis Botha, 1910-1919, J. G. Hertzog, 1924-1939, Daniel F. Malan, 1948-1954, J. G. Strijdom, 1954-1958, Hendrik F. Verwoerd, 1958-1966, J. B. Vorster, 1966-1978, P. W. Botha, 1978-1989, and F. W. de Klerk, 1989-1994. De Klerk was succeeded by Nelson Mandela in April 1994, the first African leader.
11
Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom: The Autobiography of Nelson Mandela ( Boston: Little, Brown, 1994), p. 42
14
Trevor Huddleston, Naught for Your Comfort ( New York: Double day, 1956) p. 7.
15
Chesterton has been called the Prince of Paradox. His novels include The Man Who Was Thursday ( 1908), and a crime-fiction series known for its whimsical and wise detective. He is especially known for his witty essays. His studies of Robert Browning and Charles Dickens for the English Men of Letters series provide enlightening criticism.
16
For a tribute to this remarkable African nationalist, see Desmond Tutu, "Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe", in his Crying in the Wilderness: The Struggle for Justice in South Africa ( Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans, 1982), p. 65.
17
Huddleston, Naught for Your Comfort, p. 13.
20
In his poem, "The Briscrat" ( 1927), Chesterton wrote, "Where the splendor of the daylight grows drearier than the dark".
21
Huddleston, Naught for Your Comfort, p. 44.
24
Anti-Apartheid Movement, Trevor Huddleston, CR: 80th Birthday Tribute ( London, Anti-Apartheid Movement, June 14, 1984).

-81-

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In the Footsteps of the Masters: Desmond M. Tutu and Abel T. Muzorewa
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Role of the Church In South Africa and the Legacy of Trevor Huddleston 19
  • Notes 37
  • 2 - The Role of the Church In Zimbabwe and the Legacy of Ralph E. Dodge 39
  • Notes 57
  • 3 - Tutu's South Africa and Muzorewa's Zimbabwe Compared 61
  • Notes 81
  • 4 - Desmond M. Tutu: The Man And His Mission 85
  • Notes 105
  • 5 - Abel T. Muzorewa: The Man and His Mission 109
  • Notes 126
  • 6 - Tutu's Role in the Political Transformation of South Africa 129
  • Notes 147
  • 7 - Muzorewa's Role in The Political Transformation of Zimbabwe 149
  • Notes 172
  • 8 - Tutu and Muzorewa in the Footsteps of the Masters: Summary, Conclusion, and Implications 175
  • Notes 203
  • Selected Bibliography 207
  • Index 219
  • About the Author *
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