In the Footsteps of the Masters: Desmond M. Tutu and Abel T. Muzorewa

By Dickson A. Mungazi | Go to book overview

were already having an impact on all the people of Zimbabwe, both white and African.

As Muzorewa was growing up he was introduced to painful experiences of racism that alerted him of the need to do something to fight it. Early in his life he made a decision that he was not going to stand by and watch the colonial government abuse him and his people by denying them their legitimate rights as people. This is why he pursued his studies with a purpose only he could understand. During the height of the Smith government from 1964 to 1979, Muzorewa became increasingly aware that he would have to play a role effectively in the struggle for freedom for Africans in Zimbabwe. That, too, was a mission only he could understand and undertake.


NOTES
1
Ralph E. Diffendorfer (ed.), The World Service of the Methodist Episcopal Church ( Chicago: Council of Board of Benevolencies, 1925), p. 123.
2
When Muzorewa arrived at Old Umtali in 1940 to go to school, these facilities were still there and continued to exist until they were replaced in 1966.
3
Diffendorfer, The World Service, p. 123.
4
For details of this remarkable woman, see Dickson A. Mungazi, Colonial Policy and Conflict in Zimbabwe: A Study of Cultures in Collision, 1890-1979 ( New York: Crane Russak, 1992).
5
Quoted in Diffendorfer, The World Service, p. 123.
6
This author was a member of this group, which attended Morningside College from 1961 to 1965. The group included students from the Belgian Congo, Zimbabwe, and Angola. All were supported by the Methodist Church during the episcopal leadership of Bishop Ralph E. Dodge.
7
Diffendorfer, The World Service, p. 124.
8
The influence of this event on future developments cannot be ignored. In 1962, when Huggins's United Federal Party was weakened by circumstances he could not control, Ian Smith and Winston Field broke away to form the Rhodesia Front and drew their support from dissident members of the UFP.
9
At that time the Africans did not have the vote. The Bantu Voters Association concerned itself with township elections. Africans were not allowed to claim the right to vote until the introduction of the constitution of 1961. Even then voting was by race until the elections of 1980. This is why the colonial politicians ignored the Africans.
10
Godfrey Huggins, during a debate in parliament, in Southern Rhodesia: Legislative Debates, 1938, p. 21.
12
Godfrey Huggins, "Education in Southern Rhodesia: Notes on Certain Features," (Zimbabwe National Archives, 1939).
13
Francis Meli, South Africa Belongs to Us: A History of the ANC ( Harare: Zimbabwe Publishing House, 1988), p. 277.

-126-

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In the Footsteps of the Masters: Desmond M. Tutu and Abel T. Muzorewa
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Role of the Church In South Africa and the Legacy of Trevor Huddleston 19
  • Notes 37
  • 2 - The Role of the Church In Zimbabwe and the Legacy of Ralph E. Dodge 39
  • Notes 57
  • 3 - Tutu's South Africa and Muzorewa's Zimbabwe Compared 61
  • Notes 81
  • 4 - Desmond M. Tutu: The Man And His Mission 85
  • Notes 105
  • 5 - Abel T. Muzorewa: The Man and His Mission 109
  • Notes 126
  • 6 - Tutu's Role in the Political Transformation of South Africa 129
  • Notes 147
  • 7 - Muzorewa's Role in The Political Transformation of Zimbabwe 149
  • Notes 172
  • 8 - Tutu and Muzorewa in the Footsteps of the Masters: Summary, Conclusion, and Implications 175
  • Notes 203
  • Selected Bibliography 207
  • Index 219
  • About the Author *
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