In the Footsteps of the Masters: Desmond M. Tutu and Abel T. Muzorewa

By Dickson A. Mungazi | Go to book overview

and Ian Smith, as far as the Zimbabweans were concerned, belonged to the unwanted past. All they were looking to was the future. Thus, the transformation of Zimbabwe was finally completed.

Two days after the results were known, some whites were reported to be planning to burn down their farms and homes and go away. The first action Mugabe took was to end the 15-year state of emergency Smith had been utilizing to impose a white minority dictatorship. It was also announced that Nkomo was unwilling to serve as first president of Zimbabwe; he finally accepted the position of prime minister of Home Affairs. With this new alliance, the PF appeared to consolidate its power. Zimbabwe was free at last.

The discussion in this chapter shows that three major events began to take place in the struggle for independence and in which Muzorewa was involved. The first event was the Geneva conference in 1976, the second was the internal agreement of 1978, and the third was the Lancaster House conference of 1979. Although he lost the elections of 1980, Muzorewa had played his role well except for the internal agreement which eliminated the PF from participation. This proved to be a fatal error because the British government refused to accept the agreement as a basis for independence for Zimbabwe. One sad outcome of this political saga was the continuing conflict between Muzorewa and Mugabe. It would be in the best interest of Zimbabwe to find ways of ending this conflict once and for all.


NOTES
1
For detailed discussion of the Tiger meeting, see Dickson A. Mungazi, The Cross Between Rhodesia and Zimbabwe: Racial Conflict in Zimbabwe, 1962-1979 ( New York: Vantage Press, 1981), p. 75.
2
Lincoln Evening Journal ( Lincoln, Neb.), ( September 25, 1976), p. 1.
3
Time ( October 12, 1976), p. 6.
5
Times of London ( October 12, 1976), p. 8.
7
Front-line states was a term that was used to refer to black-ruled countries of southern Africa that shared common borders with white-ruled countries. In 1976 the front-line states were Zambia, Mozambique, and Angola. However, the ones that had a profound influence on the struggle for independence in southern Africa were Zambia and Tanzania.
8
Lincoln Evening Journal ( October 4, 1976), p. 1.
9
Named after its author, U.S. conservative Republican Senator from Virginia Harry Byrd, the Byrd Amendment was part of a defense budget that allowed the United States to violate sanctions against Smith to import chromium that the United Sates needed for defense purposes.
10
Lincoln Evening Journal ( October 21, 1976), p. 1.

-172-

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In the Footsteps of the Masters: Desmond M. Tutu and Abel T. Muzorewa
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Role of the Church In South Africa and the Legacy of Trevor Huddleston 19
  • Notes 37
  • 2 - The Role of the Church In Zimbabwe and the Legacy of Ralph E. Dodge 39
  • Notes 57
  • 3 - Tutu's South Africa and Muzorewa's Zimbabwe Compared 61
  • Notes 81
  • 4 - Desmond M. Tutu: The Man And His Mission 85
  • Notes 105
  • 5 - Abel T. Muzorewa: The Man and His Mission 109
  • Notes 126
  • 6 - Tutu's Role in the Political Transformation of South Africa 129
  • Notes 147
  • 7 - Muzorewa's Role in The Political Transformation of Zimbabwe 149
  • Notes 172
  • 8 - Tutu and Muzorewa in the Footsteps of the Masters: Summary, Conclusion, and Implications 175
  • Notes 203
  • Selected Bibliography 207
  • Index 219
  • About the Author *
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