In the Footsteps of the Masters: Desmond M. Tutu and Abel T. Muzorewa

By Dickson A. Mungazi | Go to book overview

that whatever is done must be done in seeking to meet the needs of the people. He concluded that this is how national development can take place.87 National leaders of any country in Africa must reject defending practices of the colonial systems in the same way the colonial governments themselves did. South Africa and Zimbabwe, be well advised and be wise!


NOTES
1
Trevor Huddleston, Naught for Your Comfort ( New York: Doubleday, 1956), p. 247.
7
David Welsh, "Four Men on the Bridge," in The Watershed Years ( Johannesburg: Creed Press, 1991), p. 64.
9
Anti-Apartheid Movement, Trevor Huddleston, CR: 80th Birthday Tribute ( London: Anti-Apartheid Movement), June 14, 1994.
10
Desmond Tutu, "Deeper into God: The Spirituality of the Struggle," in James Wallis and Joyce Holleyday (eds.), Crucible of Fire: The Church Confronts Apartheid (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books), 1989, p. 63.
14
Mandela was born on July 18, 1918. This means that when he made the statement on February 11, 1990, he was 71 years old. For details of this fascinating man, see his autobiography, Long Walk to Freedom: The Autobiography of Nelson Mandela ( Boston: Little, Brown, 1994).
15
Nelson Mandela, Address to the People, who came to greet him on his release from prison on February 11, 1990.
17
Nationalist Party and the ANC, in a communiqué issued at the end of the first session of negotiations between the Nationalist government and the ANC, May 4, 1990.
18
The leader of the Black Consciousness Movement who was murdered in 1977 by the South African police.
19
Scott MacLeod, "South Africa: Extremes in Black and Whites", Time ( March 9, 1992), p. 38.
21
Alan Pizzey, Reporting for CBS from Johannesburg ( March 13, 1992).
22
Alan Pizzey, "South Africa: Day of Decision" CBS broadcast ( March 18, 1992).
24
Bruce W. Nolan, "South Africa Says Yes," Time ( March 30, 1992), p. 34.

-203-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
In the Footsteps of the Masters: Desmond M. Tutu and Abel T. Muzorewa
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Role of the Church In South Africa and the Legacy of Trevor Huddleston 19
  • Notes 37
  • 2 - The Role of the Church In Zimbabwe and the Legacy of Ralph E. Dodge 39
  • Notes 57
  • 3 - Tutu's South Africa and Muzorewa's Zimbabwe Compared 61
  • Notes 81
  • 4 - Desmond M. Tutu: The Man And His Mission 85
  • Notes 105
  • 5 - Abel T. Muzorewa: The Man and His Mission 109
  • Notes 126
  • 6 - Tutu's Role in the Political Transformation of South Africa 129
  • Notes 147
  • 7 - Muzorewa's Role in The Political Transformation of Zimbabwe 149
  • Notes 172
  • 8 - Tutu and Muzorewa in the Footsteps of the Masters: Summary, Conclusion, and Implications 175
  • Notes 203
  • Selected Bibliography 207
  • Index 219
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 228

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.