Position and the Nature of Personhood: An Approach to the Understanding of Persons

By Larry Cochran | Go to book overview

5
Positioning and Positing

In the drama of actualizing position, there are two distinguishable phases. First, one seeks situations or seeks to alter situations so that they will be in accord with the position one has taken. Positioning is setting the stage for the acting out of position. For example, consider Herzog outside of adventure. Certainly, he acted out of position in daily life, but by the nature of his position, he only truly and completely enacts position on an adventure. But adventures do not just happen. Herzog would have to stage the adventure, perhaps by seeking funds, gaining cooperation, gaining participation, and the like. What he does leading up to the first act is positioning; he is getting into position, so to speak. Even after embarking, the interpersonal climate might not be right. His standing in the group or his relations with others might be off. His aliveness to the drama might be subdued. Accordingly, he would have to do something to be in position. Throughout the adventure, he might continue to set the stage.

Second, one acts out of position, attempts to actualize the direction implicit in position. As noted previously, a position is an incipient purpose or pur-pose. It exists in posing or positing or making positive actualizations from itself. To act out of anger, for example, is to posit punishment. To take a position is to take on a state of incompletion that requires posits or actualizations for completion. Punishment, for instance, completes anger. Positing is what we do when we are enacting a position.

Both positioning and positing involve gaps or the filling of

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Position and the Nature of Personhood: An Approach to the Understanding of Persons
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles In Contributions in Psychology ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • 1- Orientation and Position 3
  • 2- On the Unity of Personality Concepts: Varieties of Position 21
  • 3- Composition: Diversity And Organization 39
  • 4- Metaphor as a Principle Of Composition 75
  • 5- Positioning and Positing 103
  • 6- Personality Change and The Problematic 131
  • 7- Vitality and the Origin Of Personhood 159
  • References 181
  • Index 189
  • About the Author 192
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