China and the Allies - Vol. 1

By A. Henry Savage Landor | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XLIII

Yu-lu's doings--A proclamation--Banishment and blows-- Fencing and boxing--Children of the Government--Pardon for past faults--Christians and Missionaries--Emperor's sarcasm--A message to Queen Victoria--England and China.

WHETHER acting on his own initiative or under secret instructions from the Throne--it matters little to the reader which--the fact is proved that Yu-lu, the Viceroy of Chili, was providing arms, ammunition, and food to the Boxers, while issuing edicts and proclamations, such as the one here appended, which were calculated to put foreigners off their guard.

To do him no injustice, I reproduce one of his last proclamations in full. It may be noticed that the punishment of one hundred blows, usually inflicted for petty theft, was hardly adequate for what was then regarded as the crime of rebellion; nor, probably, would any one else in Tientsin, except the British Consul, have found the behaviour of the Viceroy "quite correct" in offering to pardon men guilty of wholesale murder and theft for past faults.

The Viceroy's proclamation, after setting forth an Imperial edict issued early in the year, went on to say:

"It appears by the law that all idle persons who, instead of attending to their duties, devote themselves to teaching

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