Corporate Social Responsibility: Guidelines for Top Management

By Jerry W. Anderson Jr. | Go to book overview
If the government wants businesses to support social activities, it should give them adequate incentives to do so.

Conclusions about Businesses Performing Social Responsibility Activities

The question is not really whether a company should become involved in social responsibility activity, but rather how deeply a company should become involved in social responsibility activity. Every company most certainly must obey all social responsibility-oriented laws and requirements. They must also have a minimum code of morals and ethics to which all of their employees must agree and adhere; otherwise, each employee will establish and operate under his or her own standards to the possible detriment of the company and society as a whole.

Finally, in the area of philanthropy, each company must examine its physical capabilities, desires, and economic resources to determine just how far they want to go and can go in this area.


NOTES
1
Milton Friedman, Capitalism and Freedom ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1962), pp. 133, 135.
2
Kenneth Dayton, chairman, "Dayton Hudson Corporation, Seegal-Macy Lecture, delivered at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor ," October 30, 1975.
3
Peter Arlow and Martin J. Gannon, Social Responsiveness, Corporate Structure, and Economic Performance, Academy of Management Review 7, no. 2 ( 1982): 235-241.
4
Vernon M. Buehler and Y. K. Shetty, "Managerial Response to Social Responsibility Challenge," Academy of Management Journal 19, no. 1 ( March 1976): 66-78; Jules Cohn, "Is Business Meeting the Challenge of Urban Affairs?" Harvard Business Review 48, no. 2 ( March-April 1970); John J. Corson and George A. Steiner, "Measuring Business's Social Performance: The Corporate Social Audit" ( New York: Committee for Economic Development, 1974); Henry Eilbirt and Robert Parket, "The Current Status of Corporate Social Responsibility", Business Horizons 16, no. 4 ( August 1973): 5-14; Robert Ford and Frank McLaughlin, "Defining Corporate Social Responsibility: A Three Group Survey," Review of Business & Economic Research 17, no. 1 ( 1981): 72-77; Robert Ford and Frank McLaughlin, "Perceptions of Socially Responsible Activities and Attitudes: A Comparison of Business School Deans and Corporate Chief Executives," Academy of Management Journal 27 no. 3 ( 1984): 666-674; Eugene G. Gomolka , "An Analysis of Social Responsibility Activities Undertaken by Small Companies," Proceedings of the Academy of Management ( 1975):336-338; Louis Harris, "The Public Credibility of American Business," The Conference Board Record ( March 1973): 33- 38; Arthur M. Louis, "The View from the Pinnacle: What Business Thinks," Fortune ( September 1969): 92-95; Milt Moskowitz, "Defining Corporate Social Responsibility: A Three Group Survey," Business & Society Review no. 45 ( 1983): 23-24.; Harlan C. Van Over and Sam Barone, "An Empirical Study of Responses of Executive Officersof Large Corporations Regarding Corporate Social Responsibility,"

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