Corporate Social Responsibility: Guidelines for Top Management

By Jerry W. Anderson Jr. | Go to book overview
Save to active project

15
The Future of Social Responsibility

Agree with it, disagree with it, like it, or dislike it, social responsibility and social responsiveness are here to stay and everyone must live with them. This does not mean that if there are parts of them with which one is not in full agreement that one should not try to do something to correct or modify them.

Government, business, and society are going to have to work together more closely in the future if reasonable standards and progress are to be made in this area. To amplify and clarify what is meant here, a standard fourquadrant box and grid network can be constructed. Call the base axis "concern for society" and the vertical axis "concern for profits and economics." If the crossover point of the two axes is called "no concern, or zero concern," and the extreme right end of the base axis and the extreme top of the vertical axis are labeled "high concern, or maximum concern," then the basic box and grid is assembled. As in the Blake-Mouton grid discussed in Chapter 6, the ideal point on this social responsiveness grid would be the upper righthand quadrant, where both social concern and economic and profit concern would be maximized. Overemphasis would be placed on social welfare in the lower right quadrant of the grid, overemphasis would be placed on business in the upper left quadrant of the grid, and little concern or emphasis would be placed on either business or society in the quadrant touching on the crossover axis. What all parties involved must work for is a meeting of the minds so that all programs end up in the upper right quadrant of the grid. This is, of course, easier said than done. It should, however, be a goal toward which to work.

-261-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Corporate Social Responsibility: Guidelines for Top Management
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 284

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?