To Acknowledge a War: The Korean War in American Memory

By Paul M. Edwards | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The essence of true research is to involve the entire community.

Lewis Oglethorpe

Any research project reflects the contributions and abilities of many persons. This is particularly true for research about the Korean War. The materials about the war remain widely scattered. Many of the primary works necessary for completion of a narrative such as this are to be found in the monographs covering the subject. It is in locating these isolated works that I have sought the help of many people.

Because there are so many, and because the persons were often just doing their jobs in their normal efficient manner, I will not try to mention them all. Some, however, have gone out of their way to be of special help.

Of the many who went "beyond the call of duty" to be of assistance, I wish to acknowledge my deep appreciation to the librarian and the staff of the Combined Arms Research Library at the Command and Staff College, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas; the librarians of the Army History Center, Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania; the staff at the Air Library at Maxwell Air Force Base in Montgomery, Alabama; helpful persons at the Miller-Nichols Library of the University of Missouri ( Kansas City); the librarian and staff of Park College in Parkville, Missouri; and the research library staff of the Kansas City Public Library and the Mid-Continent Library in Jackson County.

Special thanks must go to the board and the staff of the Center for the Study of the Korean War, located in Independence, Missouri. This unique collection of Korean War letters, diaries, orders, and photographs is the source of much of the primary material consulted.

It would irresponsible not to acknowledge the help of Tammy Lindle, who so graciously spent her time reading the manuscript and has helped in so many ways to make this book possible. To Lyman F. Edwards, North Kansas City, goes my appreciation for help and guidance throughout the process.

Several other persons have contributed in a variety of ways. I would like to

-ix-

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To Acknowledge a War: The Korean War in American Memory
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Military Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Long Silence 15
  • Chapter 3 - Naming the War 27
  • Chapter 4 - Who Is to Blame 41
  • Chapter 5 - Some of the Controversies 53
  • Chapter 6 - Leaders and Scoundrels 75
  • Chapter 7 - Operations 89
  • Chapter 8 - The United Nations Force 103
  • Chapter 9 - Revising the Revisionists 121
  • Chapter 10 - The Fighting Just Stopped 135
  • Chapter 11 - The Wrong War 147
  • Bibliography 155
  • Subject Index 163
  • Military Unit Index 173
  • About the Author 177
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